Other Seminars

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Mon 9 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Calcium Regulation: From Rhinos to Molecules

Prof. Rajesh Thakker

Rajesh Thakker is the May Professor of Medicine at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Somerville and Harris Manchester Colleges, Oxford. His main research interests include the molecular basis of disorders of calcium homeostasis. He is a Consultant Endocrinologist who provides expertise... Read more

Rajesh Thakker is the May Professor of Medicine at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Somerville and Harris Manchester Colleges, Oxford. His main research interests include the molecular basis of disorders of calcium homeostasis. He is a Consultant Endocrinologist who provides expertise in the fields of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), and disorders of calcium and phosphate metabolism. He was previously Professor of Medicine at The Royal Postgraduate Medical School, The Hammersmith Hospital, London, until 1999, when he took up his present position in Oxford. He has served on the MRC Physiological Medicine and Infections Grants Committee (1994-1997), the MRC Clinical Training and Career Development Panel (1997-2000), the MRC Physiological Medicine and Infections Board (2000-2005), as Secretary to the Forum on Academic Medicine for the Royal College of Physicians (UK) and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (2002-2005), and on the Council for the Society for Endocrinology (2003-2006). He is currently Chairman of the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) / MRC Efficacy and Mechanisms Evaluations (EME) Board. He has been the recipient of many prizes which include Young Investigator Award from the ASBMR (USA), the Raymond-Horton Smith Prize (Cambridge University, UK), the Society for Endocrinology (UK) medal, the European Journal of Endocrinology Prize (EFES), the Graham Bull Prize from the Royal College of Physicians (UK), the Parathyroid Medal from the Fondazione Raffaella Becagli (F.I.R.M.O.), the Jack W. Coburn Endowed Lectureship from the American Society of Nephrology, and the Louis V Avioli Founder's Award from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (USA). Professor Thakker was elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2014.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 9 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The two faces of mesenchymal stem cells in myeloproliferative disorders

Simon Mendez-Ferrer

hosted by Irene Roberts

hosted by Irene Roberts

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 10 Feb 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

DPAG Postdoctoral Society Events

John Radcliffe West Wing and Children's Hospital, Sherrington Room, Headington OX3 9DU

Writing, discovering and sharing science with F1000

Eva Amsen

Faculty of 1000 started out in 2002 as a recommendation service for articles in biology, but recently expanded its scope to provide tools to assist scientists in writing, discovering and sharing science. This talk will give a brief overview of two of these new developments, and welcomes your... Read more

Faculty of 1000 started out in 2002 as a recommendation service for articles in biology, but recently expanded its scope to provide tools to assist scientists in writing, discovering and sharing science. This talk will give a brief overview of two of these new developments, and welcomes your thoughts about open science and collaborative tools. The first change came in 2013, when F1000 launched F1000 Research as novel platform for research publication. It uses a post-publication peer review model to offer rapid publication of research articles with fully transparent peer review and open data. A major upcoming development for F1000 is the launch of a new authoring tool that covers all aspects of writing a research article; from literature discovery and reference management to sharing and annotating papers with collaborators. Among other features, the tool allows you to search PubMed from within word, share notes on digital articles with collaborators, and get article recommendations while you type your manuscript. Attendees of this talk will receive access to the private beta of the new tool before launch. NB. Eva Amsen will be in Oxford for the rest of the day and has organised an F1000 meetup in the Kings Arms that evening. If you are interested in talking with Eva, please use the following link to register (free) beforehand: http://blog.f1000.com/2015/01/29/f1000-oxford-meet-up-on-february-10/

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 10 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 11 Feb 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

TBC

Professor Tatjana Sauka-Spengler

All Welcome to attend.

All Welcome to attend.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 12 Feb 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Thu 12 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Respiratory Medicine / WIMM

Dr Adam Mead, Dr Rachel Hoyles

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Respiratory Medicine: 'Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: fibroblasts, pirfenidone and beyond', Dr Rachel Hoyles. WIMM: 'Single-cell genomic analysis of therapy-resistant leukaemia stem cells', Dr Adam Mead.

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Respiratory Medicine: 'Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: fibroblasts, pirfenidone and beyond', Dr Rachel Hoyles. WIMM: 'Single-cell genomic analysis of therapy-resistant leukaemia stem cells', Dr Adam Mead.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 13 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor Esther T Stoeckli, University of Zurich - To cross, or not to cross axon guidance mechanisms at choice points

Prof. Esther Stoeckli

GUEST SPEAKER. During neural circuit formation, axons have to find their target cells to make appropriate synaptic contacts. Along their trajectory, axons contact one or several intermediate targets. At each of them, axons need to switch their behavior from attraction to repulsion in order to... Read more

GUEST SPEAKER. During neural circuit formation, axons have to find their target cells to make appropriate synaptic contacts. Along their trajectory, axons contact one or several intermediate targets. At each of them, axons need to switch their behavior from attraction to repulsion in order to move on. Axon guidance at intermediate targets, or choice points, depends on the precise regulation of guidance receptors on the growth cone surface. Dorsal commissural (dI1) axons crossing the ventral midline of the spinal cord in the floor plate represent a convenient model for the analysis of the molecular mechanism underlying the switch in axonal behavior. We identified a role of morphogens, Shh and Wnt family members, along with members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules, and class-6 semaphorins in commissural axon guidance at the floor plate. The multitude of guidance molecules required for axonal navigation at a seemingly easy decision point is surprising but also raises many more questions about the regulation of their expression on the growth cone surface at the time of midline navigation. In addition to regulation at the transcriptional level, we found a variety of post-translational mechanisms involved in the precise timing of guidance receptors. DPAG

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 16 Feb 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Department of Oncology seminar room (71A/B/C), ground floor, Headington OX3 7DQ

Robustness in biological systems: from DNA replication to cancer

Prof. Julian Blow

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 16 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Controlling Destructive T cells in CNS Autoimmune Disease

Prof. Stephen Anderton

Steve Anderton is Professor of Therapeutic Immunology at the University of Edinburgh. His lab is based at the Medical Research Council Centre for Inflammation Research, where he leads on the theme of Immune Modulation and Regulation of Inflammation. Steve received his PhD from the University of... Read more

Steve Anderton is Professor of Therapeutic Immunology at the University of Edinburgh. His lab is based at the Medical Research Council Centre for Inflammation Research, where he leads on the theme of Immune Modulation and Regulation of Inflammation. Steve received his PhD from the University of Newcastle and then moved to the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands, with a Wellcome Trust fellowship. He held positions at Cambridge University and Bristol University before moving to Edinburgh in 2000. From 2000-2012, he held MRC Career Development and Senior Research Fellowships and an RCUK Fellowship in Translational Medicine. Steve's main research focus is on the signals that control the activation of T cells that cause autoimmune and allergic disease. Recent work has focused particularly on the roles of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the natural resolution of CNS autoimmune disease, on how these cells interact with pathogenic effector T cells and on what might restrict the unwanted gain of pro-inflammatory function by the Treg themselves. Steve's other long-term interest is in the use of antigenic peptides as therapeutics to induce immune tolerance in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Ongoing work is exploring the cellular, molecular and epigenetic processes underlying this highly effective form of therapeutic immune tolerance.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 16 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Biomedical imaging / Epigenetics

Prof. Jens Rittscher, Dr Susanne Muller-Knapp

Advancing phenotypic screening through image analysis. Chemical probes for epigenetic targets

Advancing phenotypic screening through image analysis. Chemical probes for epigenetic targets

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 16 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, (G/F Teaching Room), Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

HERC Seminar - Developing appropriate statistical methods for cost-effectiveness analysis that use cluster randomised trials.

Manuel Gomes

Policy makers require cost-effectiveness studies to help decide which health care programmes to prioritise. The best data for evaluating group-level interventions often come from cluster randomised trials (CRTs), where randomisation is at the level of the cluster, for example the primary care... Read more

Policy makers require cost-effectiveness studies to help decide which health care programmes to prioritise. The best data for evaluating group-level interventions often come from cluster randomised trials (CRTs), where randomisation is at the level of the cluster, for example the primary care provider, rather than the individual. A fundamental issue raised by the cluster design is that individuals within a cluster tend to be more similar in their characteristics and the care they receive than those in different clusters. However, most published cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) alongside CRTs ignore the clustering. Unless appropriate methods are used, these studies will report misleading cost-effectiveness results which may lead to inappropriate decisions on resource allocation. We developed and assessed alternative statistical methods for CEA that use CRTs across a wide range of circumstances, including settings with systematic imbalance in baseline covariates and missing data. We have compared the different methods using several case-studies and statistical simulations. This work illustrates the importance of accounting for clustering in CEA that use CRTs, and provides methodological guidance and practical recommendations on the use of alternative appropriate methods.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 16 Feb 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Prof. Miklos Szabo MD PhD

SPECIAL SEMINAR - CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE For more information contact: zoltan.molnar@dpag.ox.ac.uk Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a relatively infrequent event (0,1- 0,2 %) in developed countries, however responsible for 1 M deaths and additional 1 M injured infants around the... Read more

SPECIAL SEMINAR - CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE For more information contact: zoltan.molnar@dpag.ox.ac.uk Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a relatively infrequent event (0,1- 0,2 %) in developed countries, however responsible for 1 M deaths and additional 1 M injured infants around the world. It may occur prior to, during, or after the delivery following a period of decreased placental and/or foetal blood flow. Infants typically are depressed following birth and need resuscitation, suffer multi-organ failure, furthermore, clinical signs of encephalopathy develop early in the first hours and last for long term in severe cases. Morphologically two main patterns of HIE are distinguishable, the predominantly basal ganglia / thalami involvement and the white matter / watershed area injury. Some observations made by histology of placentas of HIE infants suggest that intrauterine origin may play a role in the specific localisation of the injury in the brain. However currently it is not clear what type and extent of a specific insult is responsible for these differences.. During the first days measuring or continuous monitoring the brain electric background activity, neuronal excitation, the disturbed cellular metabolism, variations of brain circulation, inflammatory processes, free radicals involved in the development of HIE now are partly available at the bedside as well. In the future, the growing volume of these detailed clinical observations done during the early days, probably will result in a better understanding of the dynamics and temporal evolution of brain injury. Combining the results of these observations and of longer term follow up studies may help to identify the most significant players among pathophysiologic processes in the development of permanent brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has proved to be efficacious for improving long-term neuro-developmental outcome in neonatal HIE, although the mechanism of neuroprotective effect of HT is not understood well. Following clinical introduction of HT there is still a high burden of mortality and long-term neurological morbidity among survivors. Optimal postnatal intensive care during HT treatment is essential as well. The too fast restoration of the initial extreme deviations of pH, paCO2, paO2 and blood pressure - representing the asphyxial insult - may result in harm. Overshooting to hyperoxia and hypocapnia are common during early resuscitation in the delivery room and NICU, both are suspected to worsen the brain injury in the immature brain. Early start of therapeutic hypothermia can further increase the risk of hypocapnia by reducing metabolic rate and lowering CO2 production. Currently there is no acknowledged additional therapy to increase therapeutic efficacy of HT. The increasing volume of high quality clinical observations may add a significant contribution to the knowledge about normal and pathological human brain development, and inspire basic research as well. DPAG

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 17 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Loss of DNA methylation drives Polycomb redistribution

Dr. Sarah Cooper

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 19 Feb 2015 from 11:00 to 13:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

New connections between chromatin, the cell cycle and cancer

Daniel Fisher

Whereas the general principles of dynamic cell cycle regulation are now well understood, we know much less about their coordination in space and with the organisation of the nucleus. In this talk, I will present two short stories of our latest results demonstrating cell cycle regulation of... Read more

Whereas the general principles of dynamic cell cycle regulation are now well understood, we know much less about their coordination in space and with the organisation of the nucleus. In this talk, I will present two short stories of our latest results demonstrating cell cycle regulation of chromatin and its importance in cancer. The first is about a novel phosphorylation of histone H3 that we have discovered and its involvement in maintaining genome stability during DNA replication, and the second concerns the ubiquitous mammalian cell proliferation marker, Ki-67, that we have found links heterochromatin to the cell cycle and senescence.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Andrea Keyte

Thu 19 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

GU Medicine / OCDEM

Dr Amy Bennett, Prof. Helen McShane, Dr Jyothis George

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . GU Medicine: OCDEM: 'Risks Vs. Benefits Of Testosterone : Time To _Kiss_ And Tell', Dr Jyothis George.

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . GU Medicine: OCDEM: 'Risks Vs. Benefits Of Testosterone : Time To _Kiss_ And Tell', Dr Jyothis George.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 19 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Disease genes and 'healthy' human gene knockouts: Genetics for therapeutic innovation?

Prof. Richard Trembath

Professor Richard C Trembath is the Vice Principal ‚ Health Queen Mary University of London and the Head of the Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Prior to joining Queen Mary, Professor Trembath was the Director of the NIHR Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and... Read more

Professor Richard C Trembath is the Vice Principal ‚ Health Queen Mary University of London and the Head of the Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Prior to joining Queen Mary, Professor Trembath was the Director of the NIHR Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and Head of the KCL Division of Genetics & Molecular Medicine at King's College London. He is Honorary Consultant in Clinical Genetics, a recent Senior Investigator of the National Institute of Health Research, a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, a non-Executive Director of Barts Health NHS Trust and sits on the Academic Health Sciences Board of the UCL Partnership. Professor Trembath's research interest has led to the identification of disease genes and the delineation of molecular pathways underlying a range of rare human genetic disorders, including familial pulmonary arterial hypertension. Working with Jonathan Barker he has contributed to the present understanding of the genetic architecture of a range of common inflammatory skin conditions. Most recently, together with David Van Heel and Richard Durbin, he has developed a large scale population based genomic initiative, East London Genes and Health, an ambitious programme to support precision medicine.

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Feb 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Ruptured Aortic Aneurysms - Technical Progress, Logistical Problems and Political Dilemma

NDS Visiting Professor Martin Malina

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Feb 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Biophysical tools for membrane research in immunology

Erdinc Sezgin

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 20 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:15

WTCHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

'Embryonic Stem Cells: Capture of the Ground State'

Prof. Austin Smith

Pluripotency, the capacity to generate all cell types of the body, lies at the foundation of development in mammals. In 1981 scientists discovered that pluripotency could be maintained in the laboratory in cells called embryonic stem cells. Study of these unique cells over the past 30 years has... Read more

Pluripotency, the capacity to generate all cell types of the body, lies at the foundation of development in mammals. In 1981 scientists discovered that pluripotency could be maintained in the laboratory in cells called embryonic stem cells. Study of these unique cells over the past 30 years has uncovered the molecular machinery that governs pluripotency. These studies have also highlighted significant differences between ES cells from rodents and from humans. So what makes an authentic embryonic stem cell? http://www.stemcells.cam.ac.uk/researchers/principal-investigators/pressor-austin-smith

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: David Bartle

Fri 20 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

What about teaching?

Dr Marco Pontecorvi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr. David Clynes

Marco completed a Ph.D. in in the University of Rome and in the UCL followed by post-doctoral research in the MCRI, Surrey and in the LICR in Oxford. He then completed a PGCE in Physics in the IOE, London, and moved on to teach Physics, Science and Maths in Secondary schools.

Mon 23 Feb 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Mon 23 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Using Zebrafish to Unpick the Relationship Between Genes and Loading in Shaping a Joint

Dr Chrissy Hammond

Host: Professor Tonia Vincent.

Host: Professor Tonia Vincent.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 24 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Transcriptional regulation of the quiescent human haematopoietic stem cell pool

Dr. Elisa Laurenti

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 24 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 24 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Oxford Genomic Centre Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Illumina Integrated Genotyping Solutions

Coralie Vacher

An Introduction to Illumina Integrated Genotyping Solutions At Illumina we offer tools spanning the entire genomic continuum, from genotyping to whole genome sequencing to facilitate you in unlocking the true potential of your biological samples. In this session you will learn more about Infinium,... Read more

An Introduction to Illumina Integrated Genotyping Solutions At Illumina we offer tools spanning the entire genomic continuum, from genotyping to whole genome sequencing to facilitate you in unlocking the true potential of your biological samples. In this session you will learn more about Infinium, Illumina’s simple, robust array chemistry and how it has contributed to our latest multi-ethnic genome array (MEGA). We will also talk about how we can work with you to create your very own custom arrays to address specific questions relating to you research. Attendance at this seminar is free, but attendees will need to pay their own travel expenses. We look forward to seeing you there! Cora Vacher Market Development Manager – GWAS & Biobanks http://eventregistration.illumina.com/events/2015-gwas-seminar-series-integrated-genotyping-solutions/event-summary-4df7160eb62140d3be69a3e81d32ee55.aspx

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Marta Guderska

Wed 25 Feb 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

CPM - WTCHG Career Equality Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A/B, Headington OX3 7BN

Women in Science - Sophie Costello

Sophie Costello

If you would like to attend the talk followed by a sandwich lunch, please notify, Donna (brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk)..

If you would like to attend the talk followed by a sandwich lunch, please notify, Donna (brcpa@well.ox.ac.uk)..

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 25 Feb 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Virus-associated cancers of the aging skin

Prof. Herbert Pfister

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 25 Feb 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Spacing out: distributed processing of spatial information across hippocampal-prefrontal-parietal networks

Dr Matt Jones

The hippocampus contains prize-winning place cells, the parietal cortex contains exquisitely turn-selective neurons and the prefrontal cortex contains all-over-the-place cells. How are these different flavours of spatial code integrated over the course of learning to inform behaviour? I will... Read more

The hippocampus contains prize-winning place cells, the parietal cortex contains exquisitely turn-selective neurons and the prefrontal cortex contains all-over-the-place cells. How are these different flavours of spatial code integrated over the course of learning to inform behaviour? I will describe analyses of simultaneous recordings of network activity in rat hippocampus, prefrontal and parietal cortex, highlighting the roles of coordinated oscillations during wake and sleep in binding different features of the cognitive map.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Sebastian Vasquez Lopez

Thu 26 Feb 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Building effective cancer immunotherapy. Lessons from ovarian cancer

Prof. George Coukos

Professor Coukos is the Director of the Ludwig Cancer Research Center at the University of Lausanne. He is a prominent oncologist in ovarian cancer research and treatment and a pioneer in using cutting-edge advances in immunotherapy to help patients living with cancer. His laboratory studies the... Read more

Professor Coukos is the Director of the Ludwig Cancer Research Center at the University of Lausanne. He is a prominent oncologist in ovarian cancer research and treatment and a pioneer in using cutting-edge advances in immunotherapy to help patients living with cancer. His laboratory studies the mechanisms regulating the trafficking and regulation of immune cell function within the tumour and the mechanisms shaping the extent to which the presence of tumours spawns an immune system response. In addition, the laboratory is exploring the role of VEGF in immune regulation and is involved in investigating basic mechanisms of immune-vascular interactions and angiogenesis in the context of ovarian carcinoma.

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 26 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Renal Unit / Horton Hospital

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Renal Unit: Horton Hospital:

Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS . Renal Unit: Horton Hospital:

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 26 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Thu 26 Feb 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Library (please note that the front door closes at 4pm), off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Unbiased Approaches to Parkinson's Disease Biomarker Discovery

Prof. Alice Chen-Plotkin

Alice Chen-Plotkin is a neuroscientist and neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate and English literature major at Harvard University, Chen-Plotkin began her scientific training as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. She subsequently returned to Harvard for... Read more

Alice Chen-Plotkin is a neuroscientist and neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate and English literature major at Harvard University, Chen-Plotkin began her scientific training as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. She subsequently returned to Harvard for medical school and neurology training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Since 2010, Chen-Plotkin has been an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A physician-scientist, she runs a research group studying neurodegeneration and sees patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Her laboratory specializes in using unbiased approaches permitted by modern technology to generate leads in the investigation of neurodegenerative disorders, then following these leads downstream in mechanistic cell and molecular biological experiments. Recently, she has used this unbiased approach to tackle the problem of developing novel biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease (PD). Her PD biomarker research program is one of nine projects comprising the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Parkinson's Disease Biomarker Program (PDBP), a UO1-funded 5-year effort to facilitate the development of PD biomarkers. She also currently chairs the PDBP national steering committee. Alice Chen-Plotkin has been the recipient of a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Medical Scientists, a Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinician Scientist Development Award, and the American Academy of Neurology Jon Stolk Award in Movement Disorders. She is married to the Professor of Biology (University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences) Joshua Plotkin, and they have a son and a daughter. OPDC/DPAG

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Fri 27 Feb 2015 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Childhood Cancer and Ovarian Preservation

Miss Kokila Lakhoo

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 27 Feb 2015 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 27 Feb 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Professor James Johnson, Visiting Professor of Integrated Physiology from The University of British Columbia - In vivo control of heart rate and cardiomyocyte metabolism by Ryr2-mediated calcium flux

Prof. James Johnson

GUEST SPEAKER. Cardiac ryanodine receptors (RYR2) have been reported to be decreased in disease states, including diabetes and heart failure, and perhaps also as a consequence of aging. The goal of our studies is to unequivocally define the effect of losing 50% of the ryanodine receptor proteins... Read more

GUEST SPEAKER. Cardiac ryanodine receptors (RYR2) have been reported to be decreased in disease states, including diabetes and heart failure, and perhaps also as a consequence of aging. The goal of our studies is to unequivocally define the effect of losing 50% of the ryanodine receptor proteins in the heart to help answer several long-standing questions in the field. The first objective of was to determine whether having a full complement of ryanodine receptor channels is really important for setting heart rate and whether a partial reduction in these channels would, by itself, result in lethal arrhythmias. The second objective was to determine whether these ryanodine receptor channels play an important role in the organization of the heart muscle cells. The third objective was to find out whether a partial loss of ryanodine receptor channels alters the way heart cells store and use energy from fats versus carbohydrates. We are also interested to how the energy status of the heart cells controls whether the cells decide to commit 'cell suicide'. Collectively, this new information will help us understand the exact causes of heart failure, diabetic heart disease and arrhythmia, and inform efforts to stop these diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only