Other Seminars

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Mon 3 Aug 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (ring CTSU bell to enter building), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Unravelling the cellular and molecular basis of naturally acquired immunity to malaria

Prof Peter Crompton

Audience: Members of the University only

For any enquiries and to meet with the speaker, email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Tue 4 Aug 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Genomics and the nature of schizophrenia

Prof Mike Owen

Recent genomic studies have begun to reveal the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and to give important insights into the nature of the disorder and its relationship to other psychiatric diagnoses. Genetic risk does not map onto the syndromic definitions of disease that are used in the clinic.... Read more

Recent genomic studies have begun to reveal the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and to give important insights into the nature of the disorder and its relationship to other psychiatric diagnoses. Genetic risk does not map onto the syndromic definitions of disease that are used in the clinic. This, along with the lack of clear boundaries between disorders, suggests that there are likely to be overlapping mechanisms at work and that current diagnostic categories may not be optimal for stratifying cases for research into aetiology and pathogenesis. However, despite the undoubted complexity and the fact that much of the genetic risk remains unaccounted for at the DNA level, there are encouraging signs that the genes implicated converge onto sets of plausible biological processes. In particular, recent genetic data point to defects of synaptic and dendritic function and implicate mechanisms involved in brain plasticity that are important in development and in learning and cognition. While these are almost certainly not the only processes involved, they provide robust entry points for clinical and basic neuroscience research. Bio Professor Mike Owen is Director of the Medical Research Council’s Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, and Head of the Department of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences in Cardiff University. His research has focused on the genetics of major psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This has allowed him to study the impact of genetic risk factors across diagnostic boundaries and to identify specific sets of proteins involved in disease pathogenesis. As well as continuing his work on psychiatric genetics, he is currently undertaking research aimed at translating recent genetic findings into a greater understanding of disease mechanisms and into the development of novel biomarkers to aid classification and diagnosis. He was awarded the Stromgren Medal for psychiatric research in 2011, the Lieber Prize for schizophrenia research in 2012, and the William K Warren Distinguished Investigator Award for schizophrenia research in 2013. He has published over 600 scientific papers and is a Thompson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher. In addition, he continues to work as a Consultant in General Adult Psychiatry and was knighted for services to psychiatry and neuroscience in 2014.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Stefania Bocchi

Tue 4 Aug 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Understanding estrogen receptor activity in breast cancer

Dr Jason Carroll

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 14 Aug 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Lgr5+ stem cells in epithelial homeostasis and cancer

Professor Nicholas Barker

We have identified Lgr5 as a facultative component of the Wnt receptor complex specifically expressed on cycling stem cells in the intestine, colon, stomach, hair-follicles, ovary and embryonic kidney. Using a 3D ex vivo culture system, freshly isolated Lgr5+ stem cells spontaneously generate... Read more

We have identified Lgr5 as a facultative component of the Wnt receptor complex specifically expressed on cycling stem cells in the intestine, colon, stomach, hair-follicles, ovary and embryonic kidney. Using a 3D ex vivo culture system, freshly isolated Lgr5+ stem cells spontaneously generate self-organizing, self-renewing epithelial “organoids”, providing a physiological, renewable source of patient epithelia for both research and clinical applications. Employing in vivo clonal fate mapping strategies in the stomach, we further show that a balanced homeostasis of the glandular epithelium and stem cell pools is achieved via neutral competition between symmetrically dividing Lgr5+ stem cells. Long-term ablation of the Lgr5+ cell compartment in vivo severely impairs epithelial homeostasis in both the pyloric antrum and the corpus, establishing the Lgr5+ stem cell pool as being critical for daily maintenance of the gastric mucosa. We additionally characterize the transcriptomes Lgr5+ stem cells in mouse intestine, colon and stomach, revealing new gastric stem cell-specific markers that can be used to isolate human gastric stem cells for regenerative medicine applications and for use in selectively targeting cancer-causing mutations to the Lgr5+ stem cell compartment in mice as a means of evaluating their contribution to gastric cancer initiation and progression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 18 Aug 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Trials and Tribulations: the Experience of an Ebola Clinical Research Team in West Africa

Dr Jake Dunning

The ongoing Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa is unprecedented in scale and has caused significant suffering and hardships for the people living in the affected countries. For the first time, researchers had the opportunity to assess potential treatments for this often fatal infection,... Read more

The ongoing Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa is unprecedented in scale and has caused significant suffering and hardships for the people living in the affected countries. For the first time, researchers had the opportunity to assess potential treatments for this often fatal infection, but clinical trials for Ebola are far from easy. Research teams from the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, led by Professor Peter Horby, have conduced two clinical trials during the current outbreak. This talk will describe how these unique studies were conducted and the challenges the researchers faced, what life was like in the field, how far we have come with outbreak research and why there is still room for improvement. About the speaker: Jake Dunning a Senior Clinical Researcher at the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health and an Infectious Diseases Consultant. After completing his infectious diseases training in London and a PhD in Respiratory Virus Immunology at Imperial College, he joined the Epidemic infectious Diseases Research Group (ERGO) at Oxford. Since October 2014, he has been working in Liberia and Sierra Leone as the Lead Clinician and Co-Investigator for the RAPIDE Ebola treatment trials. Jake has also contributed to clinical, public health and global research initiatives for several recently-emerged infectious disease threats, including pandemic H1N1 influenza, avian H7N9 influenza, and MERS coronavirus. In October 2015, Jake will take up a new consultant role at Public Health England, specialising in respiratory virus outbreaks and emerging infections, but he will remain a Visiting Researcher at both Oxford and Imperial.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Lunch provided. Please arrive promptly. Venue has limited seating - first come, first served. When leaving the building, please use the pedestrian path and not the road.

Thu 20 Aug 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Influence of p53 on human immune and inflammatory responses in cancer and primary cells

Dr Michael Resnick

Dr. Resnick's work focuses on mechanisms of genome stability and on the function of the p53 regulatory network that signals stress and DNA chromosomal damage, using both yeast and human cells. Dr. Resnick's Chromosome Stability Group has established new roles for p53 in immunity and inflammation,... Read more

Dr. Resnick's work focuses on mechanisms of genome stability and on the function of the p53 regulatory network that signals stress and DNA chromosomal damage, using both yeast and human cells. Dr. Resnick's Chromosome Stability Group has established new roles for p53 in immunity and inflammation, finding unique p53-NFkappaB interactions in human macrophages and showing that the innate immunity Toll-like receptor (TLR) gene family in primary human cells and many cancer lines responds to chromosome stressors, mostly via p53.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Tue 25 Aug 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular investigations into -stem cell- ageing

Professor Gerald de Haan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 25 Aug 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar Room 30, Call 281231on arrival for entry, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

ŒSIV as a model for HIV infection

Professor David I. Watkins

Dr. Watkins has an extensive background in vaccine research using the Indian rhesus macaque to test vaccine concepts. He has conducted more than 10 vaccine trials in Indian rhesus macaques using a variety of regimens and challenge models. His main interests lie in finding T cell and antibody-based... Read more

Dr. Watkins has an extensive background in vaccine research using the Indian rhesus macaque to test vaccine concepts. He has conducted more than 10 vaccine trials in Indian rhesus macaques using a variety of regimens and challenge models. His main interests lie in finding T cell and antibody-based vaccines for several pathogens. He has worked with Brazilian collaborators both at FIOCRUZ and at the University of São Paulo for the last several years and has co-authored multiple publications with them. More recently his laboratory has developed a facility in culturing and measuring viral concentrations and immune responses against flaviviruses as a direct result of the use of recombinant YF17D as a vaccine vector. Dr. Watkins’ extensive experience in testing vaccine approaches in NHP gives him the necessary background to develop vaccine for HTLV-1.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Philip Goulder