Other Seminars

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Wed 1 Apr 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Patient and public involvement: what difference does it make?

Joanna Crocker

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 1 Apr 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Intracellular DNA sensing mechanisms during pathogen infection

Dr Andrea Ablasser

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 2 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Mixed Methods Research Forum

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Title TBC

Francois Van Loggerenberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 2 Apr 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Emergence of connectivity motifs via the interaction of long-term and short-term plasticity

Dr Eleni Vasilaki

The identification of synaptic mechanisms that underlie learning and memory is a key challenge for neuroscience. These mechanisms are currently assumed to be captured by persistent modifications to the synaptic connections among neurons. Synaptic connections in microcircuits and networks are not... Read more

The identification of synaptic mechanisms that underlie learning and memory is a key challenge for neuroscience. These mechanisms are currently assumed to be captured by persistent modifications to the synaptic connections among neurons. Synaptic connections in microcircuits and networks are not random; experimental observations indicate the existence of specific microscopic patterns (or connectivity motifs), with non-random features. However, it is unclear how plasticity of individual synaptic connections contributes to the formation of the observed motifs. In particular, for cortical pyramidal neurons, the degree of bidirectional connectivity varies significantly between the visual and somatosensory cortex areas (Song et al, 2005, Lefort et al, 2009). Recent evidence in prefrontal cortex (Wang et al, 2006) and in the olfactory bulb (Pignatelli, 2009) suggest that some other features of synaptic physiology, such as the short-term dynamical nature of the synapse, may be correlated to specific connectivity motifs. The causes for these structural differences are still unknown. I will present a theory based on a phenomenological, long-term synaptic plasticity "learning rule" (Pfister et al 2006, Clopath et al, 2010), that is able to accurately reproduce a vast corpus of experimental data. The rule captures dependencies on both the timing and frequency of neuronal signals, providing a very simple mechanistic explanation for the emergence of connectivity motifs (Clopath et al, 2010, Vasilaki & Giugliano, 2012, 2014, Esposito et al, 2004,2015), while shedding light on the long debate about the nature of the neuronal code.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Wed 8 Apr 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Gate-keepers of the interfollicular area: ILCs as checkpoints for adaptive immune responses

David Withers

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 9 Apr 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Electron microscopy techniques for biomedical research: from the traditional to the cutting-edge

Dr Errin Johnson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 10 Apr 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Model lipid systems and biophysical approaches for studying protein-membrane interactions

Dr Gregor Anderluh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eleanor Martin

Fri 10 Apr 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Genetic controls and cellular events during renal branching morphogenesis

Prof Frank Constantini

During kidney development, the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth from the nephric duct, elongates and branches repeatedly to give rise to the renal collecting system. This process is stimulated by GDNF signaling via Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5. Inducible... Read more

During kidney development, the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth from the nephric duct, elongates and branches repeatedly to give rise to the renal collecting system. This process is stimulated by GDNF signaling via Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5. Inducible genetic fate mapping showed that UB tip cells, which specifically express Ret and Etv4/Etv5, are progenitors for the growing collecting ducts. To investigate how the behaviors of these cells are influenced by Ret – Etv4/5 signaling, we first performed time-­‐lapse imaging of genetically mosaic organ cultures. These studies revealed that Ret signaling, via Etv4 and Etv5, promotes competitive cell rearrangements, which cause a subset of cells in the nephric duct to form the first UB tip. To ask whether similar cell rearrangements contribute to UB branching, we performed clonal analyses, using several methods to induce fluorescently labeled, recombinant clones in which the gene dosage of Ret or Etv4 was altered. Analysis of such clones, in time-­‐lapse movies of developing kidneys, indicate that the Ret – Etv4/5 pathway controls epithelial cell movements, which maintain the tip (progenitor) cell population and may promote epithelial branching.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Shankar Srinivas

All welcome.

Mon 13 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre (ring CTSU bell to enter building), Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Structural insights into severe malaria

Assoc Prof Matt Higgins

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Mon 13 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre , Headington OX3 7LF

Mechanisms Underlying A Related Loss of Skeletal Muscle

Professor Malcolm Jackson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sandra Lock

Wed 15 Apr 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Can exercise training really be a cancer therapy?

Dr Liam Bourke

Liam is an exercise physiologist with a PhD in clinical science. He is a mixed methods researcher trying to understand if exercise and lifestyle changes are of any use for people after a diagnosis of cancer. Primarily, Liam has worked with prostate cancer survivors with advanced disease on... Read more

Liam is an exercise physiologist with a PhD in clinical science. He is a mixed methods researcher trying to understand if exercise and lifestyle changes are of any use for people after a diagnosis of cancer. Primarily, Liam has worked with prostate cancer survivors with advanced disease on androgen deprivation therapy (medical or surgical castration). He has had research, reviews, editorials and correspondence in European Urology, the BMJ, New England Journal of Medicine, British Journal of Cancer and The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. His explanatory trials and qualitative work have shown that lifestyle interventions are of benefit for improving prostate cancer specific quality of life, fatigue, independent activity, functional capacity and reducing fear of recurrence. A new generation of activity in this field will be looking at establishing clinical effectiveness of such interventions in NHS service provision and also addressing research questions around the effect of exercise on cancer progression. Liam holds funding from the NIHR and CRUK to start data collection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 15 Apr 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

A20 in inflammatory signaling and pathology

Dr Geert van Loo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 16 Apr 2015 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Lower Ground Floor Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Bacterial autophagy and the cytoskeleton in host defence

Dr Serge Mostowy

Dr Mostowy’s laboratory is currently involved in studying autophagy and the cytoskeleton to understand how cells control infection. The research aims are (i) to identify and characterize host and pathogen determinants underlying the intracellular fate of cytosolic bacteria, and (ii) to... Read more

Dr Mostowy’s laboratory is currently involved in studying autophagy and the cytoskeleton to understand how cells control infection. The research aims are (i) to identify and characterize host and pathogen determinants underlying the intracellular fate of cytosolic bacteria, and (ii) to investigate the role of discovered molecules and mechanisms in vivo using zebrafish models of bacterial infection. The study of intracellular host defence may suggest the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed at bacterial infection, and possibly other disease states that also implicate cytosolic host responses.

Audience: Members of the University only

All welcome to attend

Thu 16 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Ludwig Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7DQ

Dynamic protein structure: from protein disorder to membrane pores

Frank Sobott

Our work focuses on aspects of dynamic and heterogeneous protein conformations and assemblies, using an integrated structural approach based on "native" mass spectrometry, ion mobility, and surface mapping techniques in combination with electron microscopy, SAXS and other biophysical methods. We... Read more

Our work focuses on aspects of dynamic and heterogeneous protein conformations and assemblies, using an integrated structural approach based on "native" mass spectrometry, ion mobility, and surface mapping techniques in combination with electron microscopy, SAXS and other biophysical methods. We will briefly introduce the different mass spectrometry-based Structural Proteomics approaches, and highlight the type of data which they can generate, and how they can be integrated with other structural information and with computational models. Specifically, we are going to show recent results on the detection and characterization of intrinsic disorder in proteins, including alpha-synuclein and the apoptosis-related BAX protein. A range of folding states, from disordered to compact, are characterized and interpreted using molecular dynamics approaches. These data link the conformational state of the protein with their association into larger oligomers, which are believed to be able to form membrane pores. We use detergent micelles, lipid bilayers (bicelles) and nanodiscs for both native MS and covalent labelling of exposed parts of the protein, and apply these techniques to various different ion channels including the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL). Using covalently attached, charged ligands inside the MscL channel, we can mimic the effect of mechanical pressure on the surrounding membrane and characterize various opening states using ion mobility-MS, electron microscopy, EPR spectroscopy and other biochemical and computational methods, in the absence of lipids. Frank Sobott obtained his PhD at the Goethe University in Frankfurt/M (Germany) in 2000 in Physical and Theoretical Chemistry. After working with Dame Carol Robinson at Oxford and Cambridge, he returned in 2004 to Oxford in order to take up posts in the Structural Genomics Consortium, the Centre for Integrative Systems Biology and the Centre for Gene Function, and he retains a visiting professorship in the Biochemistry Department there. At the end of 2009, he moved to the University of Antwerp in Belgium where he heads the Biomolecular & Analytical Mass Spectrometry group and coordinates the Center for Proteomics, with the title of Francqui Research Professor (2011-14). His research focuses on the structural analysis of noncovalently bound, supramolecular systems and functional assemblies of biomolecules. The group is developing new methods and instrumentation for the analysis of multi-component, heterogeneous and dynamic assemblies based on mass spectrometry, ion mobility and associated techniques. The group applies these tools in a highly interdisciplinary context to research questions from chemistry, biology and medicine.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Rod Chalk

Thu 16 Apr 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Ageing of haematopoietic stem cells

Gerald de Haan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A THURSDAY

Thu 16 Apr 2015 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Neuroinflammation Influenced by Parkinson's Disease genes SNCA and LRRK2

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Thu 16 Apr 2015 from 19:15 to 20:30

WTCHG Seminars

Sheldonian Theatre, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

Town Hall Meeting

Anne Wojcicki

Anne Wojcicki will discuss personal genomics in the genetic revolution, and its impact on healthcare, in a “Town Hall” style meeting in the Sheldonian Theatre on April 16, at 19:15. The format of the event will be introductory remarks by Anne, followed by a question and answer session... Read more

Anne Wojcicki will discuss personal genomics in the genetic revolution, and its impact on healthcare, in a “Town Hall” style meeting in the Sheldonian Theatre on April 16, at 19:15. The format of the event will be introductory remarks by Anne, followed by a question and answer session moderated by Peter Donnelly (Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics), and then questions and discussion from the audience. Anne Wojcicki founded 23andMe, following a 10-year background in healthcare investing, with a hope to empower consumers with access to their own genetic information and change the face of health care. From her vantage point, Anne saw a need for creating a way to generate more information – especially more personalized information – so that commercial and academic researchers could better understand and develop new drugs and diagnostics. The event is free and open to all, but registration is requested. For further information, and to register, please visit http://23andme.actonservice.com/acton/fs/blocks/showLandingPage/a/13144/p/p-0003/t/page/fm/0

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Fri 17 Apr 2015 from 16:30 to 18:00

Cortex Club

Pharmacology, Lecture Theatre, off Mansfield Road OX1 3QT

PKMzeta, LTP, and Memory

Dr Todd Sacktor

Most molecules implicated in memory are involved in neuronal signaling events during a brief time window lasting only minutes to hours after learning. Molecules involved in maintaining the storage of long-term memory for days to weeks have been unknown. Recently, the persistently active atypical... Read more

Most molecules implicated in memory are involved in neuronal signaling events during a brief time window lasting only minutes to hours after learning. Molecules involved in maintaining the storage of long-term memory for days to weeks have been unknown. Recently, the persistently active atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKMzeta, has been identified as a potential component of the molecular mechanism maintaining both synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP), a physiological model for memory, and long-term memory, itself. Pharmacological or genetic manipulations decreasing PKMzeta activity in adult mice or rats disrupt established LTP and long-term memories. In contrast, constitutive PKMzeta knockout mice recruit a "back-up" maintenance mechanism for LTP, involving persistent activation of the most closely related gene-product — the other atypical PKC isoform, PKCiota/lambda. After initial memory consolidation in wild-type animals, increases of endogenous PKMzeta persist within specific circuits of the brain for weeks. Overexpressing PKMzeta enhances both new and established long-term memories. Thus, by targeting PKMzeta, for the first time established long-term memories can be erased, traced, or enhanced.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Mon 20 Apr 2015 from 09:00 to 17:30

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Mathematical Institute, Andrew Wiles Building, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

OPDC Research Day 2015

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event with research talks from world leading Parkinson’s researchers on topics including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cells and animal models. Keynote talks from Professor Donald Grosset (University of Glasgow) Dr Alex Whitworth... Read more

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event with research talks from world leading Parkinson’s researchers on topics including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cells and animal models. Keynote talks from Professor Donald Grosset (University of Glasgow) Dr Alex Whitworth (University of Sheffield) Jochen Roeper Professor Jochen Roeper (Goethe University ) Registration for the 2015 OPDC research day is free and includes refreshments, lunch and reception. Please complete the registration form at www.opdc.ox.ac.uk/opdc2015registration to join us at this exciting event.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sara Bouskela

Abstract Submission closes Friday March 20th 2015 Registration closes on April 10th 2015 If you have any further queries please contact opdc.administrator@dpag.ox.ac.uk.

Mon 20 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Mon 20 Apr 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Homeostatic changes in cortex - how does the brain balance plasticity and stability?

Dr Tara Keck

The implementation of mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity are thought to provide stability of firing rates in individual cells and thus prevent either silent neurons or runaway excitation, as is the case in epilepsy. These homeostatic mechanisms have been proposed to be implemented in a... Read more

The implementation of mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity are thought to provide stability of firing rates in individual cells and thus prevent either silent neurons or runaway excitation, as is the case in epilepsy. These homeostatic mechanisms have been proposed to be implemented in a cell-intrinsic fashion. In this talk, I will describe new data from our lab, which suggest a role for network interactions and inputs to cortical cells in the implementation of homeostatic plasticity, together with classic homeostatic mechanisms. These data also provide further evidence of shifting the balance between excitation and inhibition in the adult visual cortex towards reduced inhibition, as permissive for excitatory functional changes. Thus, both homeostatic mechanisms and network interactions may facilitate the maintenance of activity. Based on these data, I will discuss potential roles for homeostatic plasticity in cortical remodeling, specifically through interactions with Hebbian plasticity, such as long-term potentiation and long-term depression.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Michael Song

Tue 21 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Call 281231on arrival for entry, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Novel correlates of acquired immunity to malaria

Dr Danika Hill

People can develop immunity to malaria following repeated exposure; hence the global search for a vaccine. However, it remains unclear how immunity is acquired. We propose that immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria requires specific types of humoral and cell-mediated cooperation, in particular... Read more

People can develop immunity to malaria following repeated exposure; hence the global search for a vaccine. However, it remains unclear how immunity is acquired. We propose that immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria requires specific types of humoral and cell-mediated cooperation, in particular merozoite opsonisation and memory CD4 T cell effector functions. We have investigated our model in longitudinal human population studies from Papua New Guinea (PNG) using in vitro assays of functional immunity. Novel whole-parasite techniques were developed to quantify merozoite opsonisation and functional CD4 T cell memory by 16-parameter flow-cytometry, and data related to clinical and parasitological outcomes. We have identified merozoite opsonisation as a strain-transcending definitive correlate of protective immunity, with up to a 85% decrease in risk of clinical malaria observed. We have measured the frequency, magnitude and breadth of CD4 memory responses to merozoites, including production of IFNγ, TNF and IL-10 and poly- functional T cells. In what is the most comprehensive study of its kind to date, investigating humoral and cell-mediated mechanisms has enabled us to build a detailed model of natural immunity and has identified novel biomarkers that will assist the evaluation of future vaccines.

Audience: Members of the University only

Tue 21 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Florian Bonkhofer, Laura Godfrey, Lucas Greder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 23 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Infection / Respiratory Medicine

Dr Lynne Curry, Dr William Flight, Professor Nicholas White

Infection: "Ague", Prof Nick White Respiratory: Medicine: ”_Aspergillus_ and the Lung: A Spectrum of Disease”, Dr Lynne Curry and Dr William Flight Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS.

Infection: "Ague", Prof Nick White Respiratory: Medicine: ”_Aspergillus_ and the Lung: A Spectrum of Disease”, Dr Lynne Curry and Dr William Flight Chair: Prof Sir Peter J Ratcliffe FRS.

Audience: Public

Thu 23 Apr 2015 from 16:00 to 17:30

Cortex Club

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

What have we Learned about Ageing and Dementia from Mouse Models?

Prof Richard Brown

The study of age-related neurobehavioural changes in genetically modified mice is important to understand the basic behavioural changes associated with aging; the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying these changes; and to develop new treatments for age-related disorders. The DBA/2J mouse... Read more

The study of age-related neurobehavioural changes in genetically modified mice is important to understand the basic behavioural changes associated with aging; the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying these changes; and to develop new treatments for age-related disorders. The DBA/2J mouse develops age-related glaucoma and is functionally blind by 12 months of age. We examined three mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and are finding that these mice have age-related visual and motor control problems as well as cognitive decline. Our goals are to dissociate the sensory and motor deficits from deficits in cognitive function and to examine sex and strain differences in the development of age-related disorders. Data will be presented on age-related behavioural deficits in the APPswe/PS1de9, 3X-Tg and 5X FAD mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. The development of new drugs depends on a complete knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying diseases of aging and the goal of our research is to uncover these mechanisms. Supported by NSERC of Canada.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Alexandru Calin

Fri 24 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

DPAG Guest Speakers

Le Gros Clark Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off South Parks Road OX1 3QX

Neural differentiation and characterization of cd31 positive cells derived from the mouse fetal cerebral cortex

Prof Tomohiro Matsuyama

Previous studies have reported that in embryonic brain, the sprouting pial capillaries penetrate the cerebral cortex and differentiate into the intracerebral vascular components. Such vascular components are commonly expressing not only CD31 but also nestin, the latter is known as a neural stem... Read more

Previous studies have reported that in embryonic brain, the sprouting pial capillaries penetrate the cerebral cortex and differentiate into the intracerebral vascular components. Such vascular components are commonly expressing not only CD31 but also nestin, the latter is known as a neural stem cell marker. We examined whether CD31-positive cells derived from the embryonic cerebral cortex have a potential to differentiate into neural lineage. The localization of CD31-positive cells in the embryonic (E17) mouse brain was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The vessel-associated nestin-positive cells co-expressed CD31. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that CD31 was localized not only to the endothelial cell membranes but also to the membrane of pericyte-like cells at adhering site to the endothelial cells. The CD31-positive cells sorted by MACS could produce neurosphere-like clusters, which differentiated into neural lineage. These results indicate that CD31-positive cerebral endothelial cells and pericytes at fetal and neonatal stage have a potential to differentiate into neural cells. It is well known that the interaction of neurogenesis and angiogenesis is coordinated in postnatal brain. The present study suggests the new mechanism for regulating neurovasculogenesis of post-injured brain.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Zoltan Molnar

SPECIAL SEMINAR - CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE // DEVELOPMENT & CELL BIOLOGY

Fri 24 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A career within the Innovation Triple Helix

Dr David Hardman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 27 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

New Richards Building, Teaching Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LG

Mon 27 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cohesin, enhancers and gene regulation

Prof. Matthias Merkenschlager

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 28 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Population and Rare Diseases Genomics: Any lessons learned about megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation?

Prof Willem Ouwehand

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 28 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

The future of investigative technologies and the exposome in occupational health

Dr Roel Vermeulen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 29 Apr 2015 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

New Radcliffe House, Room 2, Walton Street OX2 6NW

Dementia care and costs of dementia

Professor Raphael Wittenberg

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 29 Apr 2015 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Endogenous retroviruses and the immune system of the host

Dr George Kassiotis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 30 Apr 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Seminar Room 30, Call 281880 on arrival for entry, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Shining the omics microscope on the mechanism of action of compounds used in HIV cure strategies

Dr Christopher Woelk

Vorinostat is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in a shock and kill approach to cure HIV. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of Vorinostat in primary CD4 T cells has identified noteworthy off-target effects, subject-to-subject variation, as well as biomarkers that may be monitored to confirm compound exposure.

Vorinostat is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in a shock and kill approach to cure HIV. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of Vorinostat in primary CD4 T cells has identified noteworthy off-target effects, subject-to-subject variation, as well as biomarkers that may be monitored to confirm compound exposure.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Chris Willberg

Thu 30 Apr 2015 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

DNA double-strand break repair in immunity and tumour suppression

Dr Ross Chapman

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 30 Apr 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Immunology / Neurology

Dr Fatima Dhalla, Dr Ross Sadler, Dr Simon Rinaldi

Clinical Immunology: "XMEN", Dr Fatima Dhalla and Dr Ross Sadler. Neurology: "Guillain-Barré syndrome" Dr Simon Rinaldi

Clinical Immunology: "XMEN", Dr Fatima Dhalla and Dr Ross Sadler. Neurology: "Guillain-Barré syndrome" Dr Simon Rinaldi

Audience: Public

Thu 30 Apr 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Polycomb Repressor Proteins in Cancer

Dr Adrian Bracken

Cancer cells are now known to have epigenetic as well as genetic alterations. Polycomb group proteins are involved in chromatin modification and are crucial in many cell fate decisions. Adrian Bracken’s group is investigating whether dysregulation of Polycomb function is involved in... Read more

Cancer cells are now known to have epigenetic as well as genetic alterations. Polycomb group proteins are involved in chromatin modification and are crucial in many cell fate decisions. Adrian Bracken’s group is investigating whether dysregulation of Polycomb function is involved in tumorigenesis. He is also studying interactions between Polycomb proteins and other transcriptional regulators, in the context of stem cells and differentiation pathways as well as in cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward