Other Seminars

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Mon 1 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Transcriptomics reveal the immune response in tuberculosis:Type I IFN response in tuberculosis: foe & occasionally friend

Prof Anne O'Garra

Tuberculosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but despite its clinical significance, there are still major gaps in our understanding of pathogenic and protective mechanisms triggered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Type I interferons (IFN) regulate a broad family... Read more

Tuberculosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but despite its clinical significance, there are still major gaps in our understanding of pathogenic and protective mechanisms triggered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Type I interferons (IFN) regulate a broad family of genes that either stimulate or inhibit immune function, having both host-protective and detrimental effects, and exhibit well-characterized antiviral activity. Using blood transcriptomic analyses, we revealed that the tuberculosis signature was dominated by an interferon (IFN)-inducible gene profile, consisting of both IFN- and Type I IFNαβ signaling, and suggested a hitherto under-appreciated role of Type I IFNαβ signalling in human tuberculosis pathogenesis. Since then, additional studies in human tuberculosis and experimental mouse models of M. tuberculosis infection support the concept that high levels of type I IFN promote both bacterial expansion and disease pathogenesis. More recently, however, in studies in a different setting we suggest a putative protective role for type I IFN. I will discuss the mechanistic and contextual factors that determine the detrimental versus beneficial outcomes of type I IFN induction during M. tuberculosis infection, from human disease to experimental mouse models of tuberculosis. ---- O’Garra pioneered studies demonstrating the role of cytokines in immune regulation. Her work has defined mechanisms whereby key cytokines are induced by microbial products acting on innate cells to direct the development of protective immune responses to pathogens, and the regulation of such responses to prevent host damage by pathways which can also contribute to chronic infection such as in tuberculosis. The development of an appropriate immune response to a specific pathogen is essential for its eradication. However, an uncontrolled immune response can result in collateral damage to the host. O’Garra pioneered studies revealing the role of cytokines in directing the immune response required to eradicate intracellular pathogens and identified key mechanisms whereby cytokines regulate this process. O’Garra first showed that the cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) inhibits macrophage and dendritic cell function, including the production of cytokines and their antigen presenting capacity which are critical for host protection and initiation of T cell responses. Following these landmark studies on IL-10, O’Garra went on to demonstrate that microbial products induce the production of the cytokines IL-12 and IL-18/IGIF by macrophages and dendritic cells which direct the development and maintenance of T helper 1 (Th1) responses critical for protection against intracellular pathogens. O’Garra’s findings that IL-10 inhibits IL-12 driven Th1 responses by direct action on macrophages and dendritic cells have stood the test of time, and underpin the mechanisms underlying many chronic infections. In keeping with this, in a landmark study published in 2010, O’Garra demonstrated a transcriptional signature of active tuberculosis dominated by type I interferon inducible genes, which she has shown contributes to chronic disease by induction of the suppressive cytokine IL-10 and inhibition of IL-12. O’Garra’s discoveries provide a unified framework explaining how cytokine responses determine the course of infection, with major implications for the development of new vaccines and strategies for intervention in infectious and inflammatory diseases.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 1 Oct 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Prof Sebastian Springer

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 1 Oct 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Physical activity & time-series analysis

Dr Aiden Doherty, Matthew Willetts

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 2 Oct 2018 from 09:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, off South Parks Road OX1 3PL

OPDC Parkinson's Research Day

Dr Natalie Connor-Robson, Dr Paul Dodson, Dr Jimena Monzon Sandoval, Dr Dayne Beccano-Kelly, Dr Brent Ryan, Dr Thomas Barber, Dr Christine Lo, Dr Ludovica Griffanti, Dr Teresa Delgado-Goni, Dr Paul Reading, Dr Thomas Gasser

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event will include research talks by national and international keynote speakers and Oxford researchers on a range of Parkinson’s work including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cell culture and animal models. Poster Abstract Submission... Read more

The OPDC Research Day is a one-day event will include research talks by national and international keynote speakers and Oxford researchers on a range of Parkinson’s work including clinical studies, imaging, genetics, proteomics, neuronal cell culture and animal models. Poster Abstract Submission closes Friday September 14th 2018 If you have any further queries please contact opdc.administrator@dpag.ox.ac.uk.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Registration for the 2018 OPDC research day is free and includes refreshments, lunch and reception. Please complete the registration form below to join us at this exciting event. Registration closes on September 26th 2018

Tue 2 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Exploring the role of RNA modifications in myeloid leukaemogenesis

Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 3 Oct 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Davies and Gloyn Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Samy AlGhadban, Dr Phalguni Rath, Dr Nicole Krentz, Dr Jason Torres

Davies Group Speaker: Dr Samy AlGhadban Title: ‘Improved mouse mutagenesis by electroporation’ Speaker: Dr Phalguni Rath Title: ‘A platform for rapid modification of endogenous gene transcription by CRISPR/CAS9’ Gloyn Group Speaker: Dr Nicole Krentz Title: ‘Identifying mechanisms for T2D... Read more

Davies Group Speaker: Dr Samy AlGhadban Title: ‘Improved mouse mutagenesis by electroporation’ Speaker: Dr Phalguni Rath Title: ‘A platform for rapid modification of endogenous gene transcription by CRISPR/CAS9’ Gloyn Group Speaker: Dr Nicole Krentz Title: ‘Identifying mechanisms for T2D GWAS variants in hiPSCs’ Speaker: Dr Jason Torres Title: ‘Tissue-level classification of loci associated with type 2 diabetes’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 4 Oct 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Open Access and Act on Acceptance

Juliet Ralph, Nia Roberts

Covering: - Why open access, why deposit? - Depositing author accepted manuscript within 3 months of date of acceptance - Open access payments, green route and were to seek advice on payments

Covering: - Why open access, why deposit? - Depositing author accepted manuscript within 3 months of date of acceptance - Open access payments, green route and were to seek advice on payments

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lucy Curtin

Thu 4 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Cardiology / Neurology

Dr Sanjay Manohar

Cardiology: -- Neurology: Dr Sanjay Manohar -- Chair: TBA

Cardiology: -- Neurology: Dr Sanjay Manohar -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 4 Oct 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 4A, Headington OX3 9DU

Defects in Cytokine Signalling as Cause for IBD and Immunodeficiences

Dr Dominik Aschenbrenner, Dr Hebe Chen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 5 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

In depth analysis of poorly enhancing but potently neutralizing antibody against dengue virus

Wanwisa Dejnirattisai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 8 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, Lecture Theatre , 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Operating Principles of a Learning Network in Electric Fish

Larry Abbott

The electrosensory lobe (ELL) in mormyrid electric fish is a cerebellar-like structure (also mushroom-body like) that cancels the sensory effects of self-generated electric fields, allowing prey to be detected. Like the cerebellum, the ELL involves two stages of processing, analogous to the... Read more

The electrosensory lobe (ELL) in mormyrid electric fish is a cerebellar-like structure (also mushroom-body like) that cancels the sensory effects of self-generated electric fields, allowing prey to be detected. Like the cerebellum, the ELL involves two stages of processing, analogous to the Purkinje cells and output cells of the deep cerebellar nuclei. Through the work of Curtis Bell and others, a model was previously developed to describe the output stage of the ELL, but the role of the Purkinje-cell analogs, the medium ganglion (MG) cells, in the circuit had remained mysterious. I will present a complete circuit description of the ELL, developed in collaboration with Nate Sawtell and Salomon Muller, the reveals a novel role for the MG cells. The resulting model of ELL function relies on a principle of circuit organization based on the learning rather than the response properties of neurons that we have verified in the anatomy of the ELL.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 8 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Dr Oliver Stone

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 8 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

RAS, from cancer to development (and back)

Prof Hélène Cavé

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 8 Oct 2018 from 17:00 to 18:00

Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre Lecture Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Inherited arrhythmias: from bench to bedside and back

Professor Silvia G. Priori

Dr Priori, is Professor of Cardiology in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the University of Pavia. She is a world leader in the field of inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies. She combines clinical work with basic research and, among other important achievements, she discovered the... Read more

Dr Priori, is Professor of Cardiology in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the University of Pavia. She is a world leader in the field of inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies. She combines clinical work with basic research and, among other important achievements, she discovered the gene that causes the autosomal dominant form of Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia and developed the first animal model that allowed the understanding of the mechanisms for arrhythmogenesis. Based on this discovery she demonstrated the antiarrhythmic activity of Inhibition of CAMKII that is now advancing toward the development of a drug for humans and she demonstrated in the mouse model of the disease the efficacy of an RNA interference strategy to correct the consequences of the molecular defect (gene therapy).

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 10 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Sheep in Wolve's Clothing: Insect-specific viruses of mosquitoes exploited as novel platforms for diagnostics and vaccines

Prof Roy Hall

Over the last decade our group have discovered several insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in mosquitoes from different regions of Australia. These viruses do not replicate in vertebrate cells but grow to high titre in mosquito cultures. Genome sequence analyses of these viruses reveal we have... Read more

Over the last decade our group have discovered several insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in mosquitoes from different regions of Australia. These viruses do not replicate in vertebrate cells but grow to high titre in mosquito cultures. Genome sequence analyses of these viruses reveal we have discovered many new species of ISFs representing two distinct genetic lineages. Construction of infectious DNAs and chimeric viruses has allowed us to identify stages at pre- and post-cell entry where ISF infection and replication is blocked in vertebrate cells. We have also generated a series of chimeric viruses expressing the structural genes (prM-E) from pathogenic flaviviruses, including West Nile, Zika and dengue viruses, spliced into the genetic backbone of two different ISF species. These chimeras exhibit the insect-specific phenotype of their parental ISFs, growing efficiently in mosquito cells but not in vertebrate cultures but are structurally indistinguishable from virions of the pathogenic parental viruses. These chimeric viruses are proving to be excellent candidates for safe diagnostic antigens and vaccines for mosquito-borne flaviviral diseases.

Audience: Members of the scientific community

Organisers: Professor Sunetra Gupta

Please allow 5 minutes before the seminar to gain access to the building

Thu 11 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Coincidence detection tailors macrophage responses to inflammatory signals

Jelena Bezbradica Mirkovic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 11 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Haematology / Gastroenterology

Dr Jeremy Cobbold, Dr Ian Tomlinson

Haematology: -- Gastroenterology: Dr Jeremy Cobbold and Dr Ian Tomlinson -- Chair: TBA

Haematology: -- Gastroenterology: Dr Jeremy Cobbold and Dr Ian Tomlinson -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 12 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Department of Oncology

Fri 12 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

The PEARS procedure

Miss Renata Greco

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 12 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“The weakness of the enemy makes our strength” : exploiting SAMHD1 mutations to kill cancer cells

Rehwinkel Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 12 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Visual stimulus processing and spatial memory in the retrosplenial cortex

Professor Frank Sengpiel

The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) has been shown to be involved in a number of cognitive functions, in particular episodic memory and navigation, but relatively little is known about responses at the neuronal level. We have analysed activity in the RSC of awake mice to simple visual stimuli using... Read more

The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) has been shown to be involved in a number of cognitive functions, in particular episodic memory and navigation, but relatively little is known about responses at the neuronal level. We have analysed activity in the RSC of awake mice to simple visual stimuli using two-photon calcium imaging and found that single cells respond in a coarse spatially but not orientation selective manner. Interestingly, activity was strongly modulated by the animals’ locomotion, even in complete darkness. We further investigated the pattern of activity in RSC as mice were trained on a spatial memory task and found evidence for the formation of a memory engram. The stability of this engram was linked to the animals’ performance upon re-exposure to the task.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 15 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Impact of ageing on the resolution of inflammatory processes in humans

Prof Derek Gilroy

It’s accepted that the aging process alters the innate and adaptive immune system such that vaccine efficacy, for instance, become sub-optimal while wound repair processes are compromised. Moreover, fibroblasts acquire the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype thereby becoming... Read more

It’s accepted that the aging process alters the innate and adaptive immune system such that vaccine efficacy, for instance, become sub-optimal while wound repair processes are compromised. Moreover, fibroblasts acquire the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype thereby becoming hyper-inflammatory while pro-inflammatory cytokines are synthesised more readily and macrophage phagocytosis become impaired. While these disparate effects have been observed in rodents and garnered from various in vitro studies, we investigated the impact of ageing on the onset, progression and resolution of acute inflammation in aged versus young volunteers. Using cantharidin-induced skin blistering as a window into the immune system we found that some aspects of innate immunity weren’t as affected by aged as currently believed, while other phases of the inflammatory cascade, namely resolution, were defective leading to an accumulation of leukocyte debris. We identified the pathway that regulates this defect and found that it could be reversed pharmacologically in the elderly. ---- In 1997 Derek Gilroy obtained his PhD from the William Harvey Research Institute, University of London for investigations in the role of inducible cyclooxygenase in inflammation working with the late Professors Derek Willoughby and Sir John Vane. Thereafter, he left The William Harvey to receive postdoctoral training with Dr. Kenneth Wu, jointly at the University of Houston Texas and at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Tawian from 1998-2000. After which time, he returned to the William Harvey Research Institute for a further 4 years. In 2004, Derek was appointed as New Blood lecturer funded as a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow at the Division of Medicine, Rayne Building, University College London. In 2009 he became a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow and in 2010 was promoted to Professor of Experimental Immunology. At University College he is now Head of the Centre for Clinical Pharmacology where he has pioneered research examining the molecular and biochemical pathways that regulates the resolution of acute immune reactions. Prof. Gilroy has won the Bayer International Young Investigator Award for aspirin Research, 2005 and the British Pharmacological Society, Norvartis Award, 2007.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 15 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mechanisms controlling homeostasis in mammalian epidermis

Professor Fiona Watt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

2018 Craig Jordan Lecture

Mon 15 Oct 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Dementia & app development

Dr Chris Hinds, Devesh Batra

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 17 Oct 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Unexpected roles of tissue-localized macrophages in the developing CNS

Dr Yosuke Mukoyama

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 17 Oct 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Development & Cell Biology Theme Guest Speakers (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Transcriptional and epigenetic control of vascular homeostasis

Professor Anna M. Randi, MD PhD

Anna Randi is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London. Her research interests are in vascular biology and haemostasis, and in the areas of overlap between these two fields. Major recent findings from the laboratory are the... Read more

Anna Randi is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London. Her research interests are in vascular biology and haemostasis, and in the areas of overlap between these two fields. Major recent findings from the laboratory are the characterisation of endothelial transcriptional networks controlling vascular health, centred on the transcription factor ERG, and the identification of von Willebrand factor as a regulator of blood vessel formation. A major effort has been directed in using circulating endothelial progenitors from patients’ blood, to identify novel mechanisms of disease in patients with the genetic bleeding disorder von Willebrand disease and in patients with CV disease associated with the lung disorder COPD. Anna Randi is a clinically qualified haematologist, specialized in haemostasis and thrombosis. She obtained her medical degrees and PhD from the University of Milan (Italy). She trained at Washington University, St. Louis (USA), in J.E. Sadler’s laboratory where she was involved in the first characterization of mutations in the von Willebrand factor gene. From here she moved to the UK, and began her studies on endothelial biology and vascular diseases. She spent 7 years at GlaxoSmithKline, as group leader and then Head of Translational Medicine (Inflammation); during this time, Anna Randi also held an honorary contract with Imperial College London, where she eventually moved her lab in 2003. Anna Randi serves on BHF grant and fellowship committees, on Wellcome Trust and on international review panels. Between 2014 and 2017 she was on the Editorial Board of Blood. She has served as co-Chair of the Scientific Subcommittee on Vascular Biology of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). She is a member of numerous scientific organisations, a Fellow of the American Heart Association (FAHA) and member of the ATVB leadership committee. Anna Randi is committed to promoting the careers of young researchers; she believes in providing a supportive and stimulating training and working environment for all, with particular concerns on gender equality. London, May 2018

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Katherine McNeil

Thu 18 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

Respiratory / Acute General Medicine Firm C

Dr Annabel Nickol

Respiratory: Dr Annabel Nickol -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: -- Chair: TBA

Respiratory: Dr Annabel Nickol -- Acute General Medicine Firm C: -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 18 Oct 2018 from 14:00 to 15:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Innate barrier function as a therapeutic target in IBD

Dr Zoe Christoforidou, Dr Sumeet Pandey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds

Mr Hamish Dibley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fri 19 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Synaptic dynamics in mouse visual cortex following sensory deprivation

Dr Tara Keck

Homeostatic synaptic scaling is thought to occur cell-wide, but recent evidence suggests this form of stabilizing plasticity can be implemented more locally in reduced preparations. To investigate the spatial scales of plasticity in vivo, we used repeated two-photon imaging in mouse visual cortex... Read more

Homeostatic synaptic scaling is thought to occur cell-wide, but recent evidence suggests this form of stabilizing plasticity can be implemented more locally in reduced preparations. To investigate the spatial scales of plasticity in vivo, we used repeated two-photon imaging in mouse visual cortex after sensory deprivation to measure TNF-α dependent increases in spine size as a proxy for synaptic scaling in vivo in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We found that after sensory deprivation, increases in spine size are restricted to a subset of dendritic branches, which we confirmed using immunohistochemistry. We found that the dendritic branches that had individual spines that increased in size following deprivation, also underwent a decrease in spine density. Within a given dendritic branch, the degree of spine size increases is proportional to recent spine loss within that branch. Using computational simulations, we show that this compartmentalized form of synaptic scaling better retained the previously established input-output relationship in the cell, while restoring activity levels. We then investigated the relationship between new spines that form after this spine loss and strengthening and find that their spatial positioning facilitates strengthening of maintained synapses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 22 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Prof Max Loehning

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 23 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Vector-mediated prophylaxis against airborne infectious viruses

Professor Maria Limberis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 25 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

OCDEM / Rheumatology

Prof David Ray, Dr Hamish Reid, Dr Natasha Jones

OCDEM: "Glucocorticoid action, and inaction", Prof David Ray -- Rheumatology: Dr Hamish Reid and Dr Natasha Jones -- Chair: TBA

OCDEM: "Glucocorticoid action, and inaction", Prof David Ray -- Rheumatology: Dr Hamish Reid and Dr Natasha Jones -- Chair: TBA

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds

Dominic Furniss

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The autoantibody

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 26 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Genetic regulators of cardiovascular development

Dr Kelly Smith

We are dependent on our cardiovascular system for life support. Defects in the formation of either the heart or vasculature can be fatal in utero, reflecting our dependency on this system from almost the earliest stages of life. The cardiovascular system is remarkably stereotypical in its... Read more

We are dependent on our cardiovascular system for life support. Defects in the formation of either the heart or vasculature can be fatal in utero, reflecting our dependency on this system from almost the earliest stages of life. The cardiovascular system is remarkably stereotypical in its structure, both between individuals and across species. This demonstrates that a strict genetic programme dictates this structure and that the programme is conserved. Focussing primarily on the early stages of heart development, we utilise the zebrafish model for its genetic tractability to identify regulators of cardiovascular development. Using forward genetics, we have discovered several novel regulators of cardiac and vascular development. One such regulator is a novel Hyaluronidase, named Cemip2 (formerly Tmem2), that is required for both cardiac development and angiogenesis. Early data suggests that the function of this protein is conserved in mammals. We have also identified a regulator of N-cadherin trafficking and show that it is required for cardiomyocyte cell adhesion. Whilst exciting for discovery’s sake, this fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding inherited cardiovascular diseases and in plying our knowledge to devise therapeutic strategies.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

The role of ATRX in repairing internal and telomeric DNA double-strand breaks

Professor Markus Löbrich

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Inflammation and Microbiome in Cancer and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Dr Ze'ev Ronai

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Multimodal mass spectrometry imaging of tumours

Prof Josephine Bunch

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most powerful techniques for chemical analysis and when combined with an imaging modality allows molecular chemistry to be visualised in 2D and 3D, from the nano- to the macroscale, in ambient conditions and in real‐time. There are numerous techniques each... Read more

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most powerful techniques for chemical analysis and when combined with an imaging modality allows molecular chemistry to be visualised in 2D and 3D, from the nano- to the macroscale, in ambient conditions and in real‐time. There are numerous techniques each having different modes of operation including label‐free and labelled analyses. In 2017 the CRUK Grand Challenge programme was launched. By pursuing a multiscale (organ to organelle) and multi-omics approach with a range of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques (MALDI, DESI, SIMS and ICP MS), we aim to deepen our understanding of the interplay of genes, proteins, metabolites and the role of the immune system in cancer development and growth. This presentation will review early results and a discussion of the challenges associated with such a large, multi-technique, multi-site, mass spectrometry project. ---- Professor Josephine Bunch is a Principal Scientist and Co-Director of the National Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry Imaging (NiCE-MSI) at NPL and Chair of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry at Imperial College London. She is currently leading a Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge programme (2017-2022; £16 million). She has expertise in a range of mass spectrometry imaging techniques and her group at NPL comprises a multidisciplinary team of around 20 people. To support innovation and instrument development for MSI, Josephine leads a large programme of research and metrology in MALDI and ambient mass spectrometry imaging, funded by the National Measurement System. Within this project a new transmission mode, atmospheric MALDI ion source, with dual mode post-ionisation has been constructed. The group also hosts and co-supervises Ph.D. students from the University of Nottingham, the University of Birmingham, Imperial College London, Oxford University and the University of Surrey.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Salmonella persisters during infection

Dr Sophie Helaine

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 29 Oct 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Phenome@BDI Seminar: Meta catalogue of OUH clinical databases

James Welch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 30 Oct 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells

Professor Andreas Trumpp

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose