Other Seminars

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Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Greg H Crawford

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 1 Nov 2018 from 16:30 to 18:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, John Radcliffe Main Building, George Pickering Education Centre Level 3 Academic Centre, Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

TBC

TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Holm Uhlig

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Klenerman Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Title TBC

Dr Christine Des Rosier

TBC

TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a,b,c, Headington OX3 7DQ

FAN1: a Fanconi anaemia (FA) protein but not a FA gene

Professor Josef Jiricny

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 5 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Genomic Epidemiology of Emerging Viruses: Disease X, Yellow Fever, and Zika

Prof Oliver Pybus

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Uhlig Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Stronger together: understanding pancreatic beta-cell connectivity in health and disease

Professor Guy Rutter

Persistently elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids are known to contribute to failed insulin secretion during the development of Type 2 diabetes. We have shown that glucolipotoxic conditions impair cell-cell communication (“connectivity”) to impair insulin secretion (Hodson et al, 2013).... Read more

Persistently elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids are known to contribute to failed insulin secretion during the development of Type 2 diabetes. We have shown that glucolipotoxic conditions impair cell-cell communication (“connectivity”) to impair insulin secretion (Hodson et al, 2013). Recently (Johnston et al, 2016) we have combined optogenetics and rapid Ca2+ imaging across the islet syncytium to demonstrate that a subset (~5%) of beta cells (“hubs”) coordinate the activity of “follower” cells. Photo-painting using a light sensitive-RFP revealed that hub cells are enriched for glucokinase, but show low levels of Nkx6.1 and insulin gene expression. These cells also display enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential in response to high glucose. Interrogation of single β cell RNASeq data (Xin et al PNAS, 2016) confirms the existence of a subset of cells with a similar transcriptomic configuration. Hub cells are unusually susceptible to metabolic stresses including high fatty acid/glucose levels, and cytotoxic cytokines, suggesting that they may be targeted in diabetes. Since deletion of GWAS genes for diabetes including ADCY5 and TCF7L2 affect cell-cell communication, future work will explore the possibility that genes at other loci, including STARD10 (Carrat et al, 2017) also act in part by altering hub cell-led β cell connectivity. Recent findings exploring the existence of β cell sub-populations in islets in the living animal, including zebra fish and after engraftment into the anterior chamber of the mouse eye, will also be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 12 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

Molecular mechanisms to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress

Prof David Ron

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Sympathetic Neuroimmunity in obesity

Dr Ana Domingos

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Microbial-host interactions involved in obesity and the response to bariatric surgery

Dr Carolina Arancibia, Dr Alessandra Geremia, Valentina Greto

Obesity has reached alarming levels in the UK. According to a government report, one in four adults are obese in the UK. Medical and dietary interventions are often ineffective at inducing weight loss and the best outcomes are obtained after weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery).... Read more

Obesity has reached alarming levels in the UK. According to a government report, one in four adults are obese in the UK. Medical and dietary interventions are often ineffective at inducing weight loss and the best outcomes are obtained after weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery). These surgical procedures were initially thought to work mechanistically through stomach restriction and lower calorie absorption through the shortened intestine. However, recent evidence has challenged this concept and it has been suggested that changes in the gut microbial flora could affect metabolism contributing to weight loss and increased insulin response. Gut flora is beneficial to the host in many ways, contributing to for example, nutrient absorption and a healthy immune system. Abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbes are thought to contribute to the pathology of certain diseases, including obesity and diabetes. The aim of this project is to find out how altered host and microbial functions affect weight loss and metabolism after bariatric surgery. Understanding more about the microbial flora and how this impacts patient’s health will hopefully make way for new approaches in the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Thu 15 Nov 2018 from 15:00 to 16:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Evaluation of the stromal compartment activation in therapy-refractory inflammatory bowel disease patients that require surgical intervention

Matthias Friedrich

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in its manifestations Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect all parts of the digestive tract. Environmental factors, genetic predisposition and an abnormal function of the immune system are thought to cause... Read more

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in its manifestations Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect all parts of the digestive tract. Environmental factors, genetic predisposition and an abnormal function of the immune system are thought to cause IBD.
Standard therapies aim at controlling intestinal inflammation and prolonging the time between disease flare-ups. Although significant progress has been made over the last decades, a high proportion of patients still do not respond to these anti- inflammatory therapies, or become resistant during the course of treatment. Failure to therapeutically control chronic inflammation can lead to severe complications in IBD patients, such as fibrosis, which requires surgical intervention. Fibrotic changes in the intestine are driven by an activation of a particular cell type, the fibroblast. The aim of this project is to find out whether IBD patients that go on to require surgery display an activation of fibroblasts, and which changes in the tissue are associated with this activation. For this, differences in the way the surgically removed fibrotic tissue is programmed will be compared to the programming of non-inflamed ‘normal’ tissue. We believe that certain alterations in this programming, which is controlled by a network of signals, can lead to changes that are specifically associated with inflammation and the requirement for surgery. Differences in the networks of signals which make up this program of inflamed and non-inflamed tissue will help us identify novel, fibroblast-targeting, therapies which will disrupt the inflammation program and hopefully reduce the requirement for surgery.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

McMichael Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 16 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Macrophage contribution to Insulin Resistance independently of Inflammation

Dr Myriam Aouadi

Since the discovery of macrophages in adipose tissue, many laboratories have focused their effort on understanding the contribution of these immune cells to metabolic diseases. Despite great progress in characterizing obesity as a state of low-grade inflammation, very little is known about the... Read more

Since the discovery of macrophages in adipose tissue, many laboratories have focused their effort on understanding the contribution of these immune cells to metabolic diseases. Despite great progress in characterizing obesity as a state of low-grade inflammation, very little is known about the multiple phenotypes and functions of macrophages in metabolic tissues. The lack of methods to carefully investigate cell-to-cell variability in macrophage phenotype and to manipulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner has delayed answering these crucial questions. Our lab takes advantage of sophisticated methods, such as next generation sequencing, CytOF and gene silencing in a cell specific manner, to investigate macrophage subpopulations and their function in obesity-associated metabolic complications.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Molecular determinants of dominant-negative mutations in protein complexes

Dr Joe Marsh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Mon 19 Nov 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Using transcriptomics to understand neurodegenerative disorders

Dr Mina Ryten

As an MBPhD graduate (Cambridge University & University College London) and Academic Clinical Fellow in Neurology (London Deanery), I have been lucky enough to receive training in basic research as well as clinical medicine. I have thoroughly enjoyed both and am committed to pursuing a joint... Read more

As an MBPhD graduate (Cambridge University & University College London) and Academic Clinical Fellow in Neurology (London Deanery), I have been lucky enough to receive training in basic research as well as clinical medicine. I have thoroughly enjoyed both and am committed to pursuing a joint clinical and research career in neuroscience. However, I am fully aware that the gap between clinical realities and basic research can be hard to bridge. During my PhD I investigated the role of a specific signalling system, purinergic signalling, in skeletal muscle development and regeneration under the supervision of Professor Geoffrey Burnstock (University College London). Using techniques such as cell culture, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, I was able to dissect out the role of an individual signalling pathway. I demonstrated that activation of the P2X5 receptor for ATP potentiated muscle stem cell differentiation and that this process was dependent on activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Since my PhD the advent of high through-put microarray and sequencing-based technologies have made it possible to take a systems approach and so have the potential to provide exciting insights into complex neurological diseases. With this is in mind I have sought to develop new skills in biomedical informatics and currently hold an MRC Post-doctoral Training Fellowship in Biomedical Informatics. This fellowship has given me the opportunity to pursue my interest in the pathophysiological basis of risk genetic loci for neurodegenerative diseases and that is the focus of my current research.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Tue 20 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Veronique Azuara

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Cerundolo Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GL Brown Lecture (PhySoc) - Seeing depth with two eyes: the binocular physiology of 3D space

Progessor Andrew Parker

Neurons that are specifically tuned to binocular depth were discovered in seminal work published 50 years ago by Horace Barlow, Colin Blakemore and Jack Pettigrew in the Journal of Physiology. Their study in the primary visual cortex opened up the era of understanding the physiology of 3-D... Read more

Neurons that are specifically tuned to binocular depth were discovered in seminal work published 50 years ago by Horace Barlow, Colin Blakemore and Jack Pettigrew in the Journal of Physiology. Their study in the primary visual cortex opened up the era of understanding the physiology of 3-D perception. Thanks to more recent work, we now know that large areas of the extrastriate visual cortex are involved. Sites where binocular stereoscopic depth is integrated with other visual information can be identified and physiological signals related to active perceptual decisions about depth can be isolated. At some sites, a causal role of physiological signals for the perception of depth can be demonstrated by showing that weak electrical microstimulation of the cortex can alter behavioural reports of depth perception. However, there seems to be no single brain module that is responsible for computing stereoscopic depth. This lecture will trace these paths of discovery in human and animal studies. Andrew Parker will show how a better understanding of the physiology of depth perception changes our view of how the brain constructs a representation of the space around us. Findings from this neurophysiological research have implications for the growing popularity of 3-D cinema and immersive virtual reality.

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 26 Nov 2018 from 12:30 to 13:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Stillbirth: Death by another name

David Monteith

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 26 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

JAK/STAT signalling, stem cell subversion

Professaor Tony Green

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Fri 30 Nov 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Ogg Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 30 Nov 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Coping with a stressful start in life

Professor Alex Gould

Joint Seminar with the Dunn School Environmental stresses experienced during development (early-life) exert both short and long-term influences upon health and disease. In most cases, however, the underlying biological response mechanisms remain mysterious. The goal of our research is to... Read more

Joint Seminar with the Dunn School Environmental stresses experienced during development (early-life) exert both short and long-term influences upon health and disease. In most cases, however, the underlying biological response mechanisms remain mysterious. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular nuts and bolts of how early-life environmental stresses alter gene expression, metabolism and physiology. Much of our research uses the powerful genetics of the fruit fly Drosophila, together with analytical techniques such as metabolomics and mass spectrometry imaging. Using this combined approach, we identified molecular mechanisms that protect neural stem cells in the developing CNS from the immediate harmful effects of malnutrition and hypoxia. For example, we found that hypoxia induces lipid droplets in the local microenvironment (niche) of the neural stem cells. Droplets function to protect neural stem cells from lipid peroxidation damage, likely by sequestering potentially vulnerable polyunsaturated fatty acids in their core. We have also begun investigating the longer-term impact of early-life stresses upon longevity. Recent work shows that developmental exposure to mild oxidative or nutritional stress can, in some cases, extend rather than shorten lifespan. I will discuss the surprising mechanisms that account for stress-induced longevity and the degree to which they may be conserved between flies and mammals.

Audience: Members of the University only