Other Seminars

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Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Safe surgery in Africa: Exploring barriers and trialling interventions

Professor Peter McCulloch, Dr Tinashe Chandauka

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Close encounters of the B-T kind: Dock8 and the lack of memory

Dr Mukta Deobagkar-Lele

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Microglia in neurodegeneration

Professor Guy Brown

Guy Brown is Professor of Cellular Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. He has published over 150 papers and several books (www.guybrown.net). Research interests include: i) microglia, ii) neuroinflammation, iii) phagocytosis, iv) neurodegeneration, v) mitochondria and (vii) cell death.... Read more

Guy Brown is Professor of Cellular Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. He has published over 150 papers and several books (www.guybrown.net). Research interests include: i) microglia, ii) neuroinflammation, iii) phagocytosis, iv) neurodegeneration, v) mitochondria and (vii) cell death. Current research is particularly focused on preventing detrimental phagocytosis of neurons and synapses by microglia in brain pathology.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 11:30 to 12:15

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, Headington OX3 9DU

REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder: from circuits to pathology

Pierre-Hervé Luppi

I'm devoted to the study of the neuronal network responsible for (REM) paradoxical sleep and its dysfunctions occurring in REM sleep behavior disorder and narcolepsy since 1983. I'm a specialist in REM sleep atonia, a subject relevant to cataplexy of narcoleptics, RBD and sleep apnea. I'm also... Read more

I'm devoted to the study of the neuronal network responsible for (REM) paradoxical sleep and its dysfunctions occurring in REM sleep behavior disorder and narcolepsy since 1983. I'm a specialist in REM sleep atonia, a subject relevant to cataplexy of narcoleptics, RBD and sleep apnea. I'm also actively trying to identify the function of paradoxical (REM) sleep. I'm currently using optogenetic and chemogenetic to resolve these questions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Physiological role and mode of regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling and metabolism interrogated by imaging and optometabolic control

Professor Israel Sekler

The mitochondrial membrane potential powers both ATP production and mitochondrial Ca2+ transient of mitochondrial Ca2+ permeation into the mitochondria via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter MCU followed by Ca2+ efflux by by the 3Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, NCLX that was discovered by our group . In the... Read more

The mitochondrial membrane potential powers both ATP production and mitochondrial Ca2+ transient of mitochondrial Ca2+ permeation into the mitochondria via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter MCU followed by Ca2+ efflux by by the 3Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, NCLX that was discovered by our group . In the first part of my talk I will describe a new strategy for controlling the mitochondrial membrane potential. We are using optogenetic channels for a light dependent control in mitochondrial l membrane potential . In the first part of my talk I will described the challenges of targeting these "optometabolic channels to mitochondria and of using them to study metabolic processes, Ca2+ signaling and physiological activities. The second part on my talk will focus on our studies of the mitochondrial NCLX. . I will first describe how by combining molecular control of NCLX activity with cytosolic or mitochondrial Ca2+ imaging we study the role of NCLX in cell models related to diabetes Parkinson (PD) or pain sensation. I will then describe the mode of NCLX regulation by PKA phosphorylation. Finally I will present new data linking phosphorylation of NCLX to allosteric regulation of NCLX by mitochondrial membrane potential and describe the physiological implication of this regulation on thermogeneration in brown fat.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 19 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 16:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

The Oxford Union, Goodman Library, St Michaels' Street OX1 3JB

Public debate at The Oxford Union: Climate Change and Health

Goodman Library Oxford Union - Students from the MSc International Health & Tropical Medicine class will debate issues surrounding climate change and health (two debates during the course of the afternoon). This year’s cohort are a diverse group of 18 students from 15 countries with disciplinary... Read more

Goodman Library Oxford Union - Students from the MSc International Health & Tropical Medicine class will debate issues surrounding climate change and health (two debates during the course of the afternoon). This year’s cohort are a diverse group of 18 students from 15 countries with disciplinary backgrounds covering Medicine/Public Health, Health Informatics, Molecular Biology, Biophysics & Biochemistry, Development Studies, International Relations, Environmental Management and Anthropology. We expect a lively debate offering diverse perspectives on health issues within resource limited contexts.

Audience: Public

Mon 22 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Function and execution of RTEL1 activities at vertebrate telomeres

Simon Boulton PhD FMedSci

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 22 Jan 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Increasing memory potential: How asymmetric cell division modulation impacts T cell fate

Dr Mariana Borsa

Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a conserved mechanism to establish differentiation, resulting in two daughter cells with differential potential fates. We compared the extent of ACD upon activation of different subsets of CD8+ T cells. Our results suggest that "stem" cells endowed with the ability... Read more

Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a conserved mechanism to establish differentiation, resulting in two daughter cells with differential potential fates. We compared the extent of ACD upon activation of different subsets of CD8+ T cells. Our results suggest that "stem" cells endowed with the ability to undergo clonal (re)expansion show higher ACD rates in comparison to cells that are unable to form a memory reservoir. Furthermore, we found that mTOR inhibition is able to increase ACD rates and that this reflects in daughter cells that, when transferred to new hosts and submitted to viral rechallenge, show better re-expansion and virus protection capacity. ---- I graduated in Biology in 2010 at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) in Brazil. I was awarded a CNPq 'scientific initiation' fellowship from 2008 to 2010 and in that period I studied the immune system of Crustacea and developed monoclonal antibodies for immunodetection of shrimp viruses (Borsa et al., 2011; Seibert et al., 2010). I completed my Masters degree in Biotechnology and Biosciences also at UFSC in 2012. I was awarded a CAPES fellowship for the period of my Master studies about Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) activation by HIV infection (Borsa et al., 2015). I then worked as a Biology high school teacher in Brazil until I joined the lab of Annette Oxenius at ETHZ in 2014. During my PhD I have been working with asymmetric cell division in CD8 T lymphocytes and trying to understand how this mechanism impacts T cell fate and can be modulated to provide better memory potential and protection against viral infections.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 23 Jan 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre - 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cell type-specific translation profiling in fragile X

Dr Emily Osterweil

Chancellor’s Fellow, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh Dr Osterweil's research questions are being investigated in multiple neural circuits using biochemical, electrophysiological and systems-level approaches. Current projects include: Determining the role of NMDA... Read more

Chancellor’s Fellow, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh Dr Osterweil's research questions are being investigated in multiple neural circuits using biochemical, electrophysiological and systems-level approaches. Current projects include: Determining the role of NMDA receptors in local protein synthesis Tracking cell type specific changes in translation during plasticity using cell type-specific Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification and RNA-seq Investigating the translation control pathways linked to different postsynaptic receptors Exploring the role of protein turnover in synaptic plasticity​ Dr Osterweil's group are studying these basic biological questions using animal models of fragile X syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis, and other neurodevelopmental disorders. It is their belief that identifying the mechanisms that go awry in these models will simultaneously address fundamental questions of synaptic function, and provide a better understanding of autism and ID.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Tue 23 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Anti-inflammatory treatment for coronary artery disease – the CANTOS trial

Marcus Flather graduated from the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine and trained in general medicine and cardiology in London and Oxford. In 1988 he joined CTSU at the University of Oxford, working on large clinical trials in acute coronary syndromes, and continued this work at McMaster... Read more

Marcus Flather graduated from the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine and trained in general medicine and cardiology in London and Oxford. In 1988 he joined CTSU at the University of Oxford, working on large clinical trials in acute coronary syndromes, and continued this work at McMaster University from 1993-1996 before being appointed Director of the Clinical Trials and Evaluation Unit and Consultant Cardiologist at Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals. In September 2011 he was appointed Professor of Medicine and Clinical Trials at the University of East Anglia and Director of Research at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in Norwich. He is a recognised expert in clinical trials and has more than 20 years’ experience collaborating with academic and industry partners in drug and device development. In this seminar, Professor Flather will discuss results from the recently published CANTOS trial in which canakinumab therapy yielded benefit for both cardiovascular and cancer outcomes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 24 Jan 2018 from 10:30 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

DPhil Seminar: Developing and evaluating behavioural interventions to reduce meat consumption

Filippo Bianchi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Daniel Long

Wed 24 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Muslim perspectives on palliative and end of life care

Mehrunisha Suleman

Every community has its own religio-cultural understanding of death, its rites, rituals and beliefs. Although there is a growing Muslim population in the UK, many of whom either access or provide healthcare services within the NHS, very little is known about the beliefs, processes and practices... Read more

Every community has its own religio-cultural understanding of death, its rites, rituals and beliefs. Although there is a growing Muslim population in the UK, many of whom either access or provide healthcare services within the NHS, very little is known about the beliefs, processes and practices they use in relation to death, dying and remembrance. In this presentation, I will share findings from an empirical study that offers a thematic analysis of 50+ interviews with Muslim patients and families as well as doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, chaplains and community faith leaders across the UK. The themes include ethical challenges raised by the reconciliation of beliefs and practices in Muslim communities when they encounter the health service, the role of faith leaders and religio-cultural commitments in the understanding and articulation of values around death and dying such as, acceptance and hope. The presentation will also explore how attitudes and practices amongst Muslim communities in the UK is changing and how such intergenerational transitions in the beliefs, processes and practices in relation to death, dying and remembrance may impact access to health services and the practice of professionals delivering care. The study shows that Islam, its texts and lived practice, finds growing importance within the UK end of life care discourse as there is an increasing Muslim population and burgeoning interest in the role of faith and spirituality in healthcare decision making. It also indicates that patients and practitioners alike rely on multiple moral sources to make decisions and face moral anxiety and frustration when these different moral sources are in conflict. An analysis of such tensions will be presented with an evaluation of implications for health systems, health care services, providers and users. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 24 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

DPhil Seminar: How can we help people lose weight through daily weighing?

Kerstin Frie

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Daniel Long

Thu 25 Jan 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Value of Sample Information as a Tool for Clinical Trial Design

Anna Heath, PhD Student

Abstract: The Expected Value of Sample Information (EVSI) uses evidence about the costs and effectiveness of different interventions to calculate the economic value of specific trial designs. Despite the potential benefits of using the EVSI, in terms of finding economically valuable trial designs,... Read more

Abstract: The Expected Value of Sample Information (EVSI) uses evidence about the costs and effectiveness of different interventions to calculate the economic value of specific trial designs. Despite the potential benefits of using the EVSI, in terms of finding economically valuable trial designs, practical applications have been limited due to computational difficulties and ease of interpreting the results. Recently, methods have been developed to allow for the efficient computation of the EVSI across different trial designs. This allows researchers to use the EVSI as a tool for clinical trial design. This talk will present a recent method for EVSI calculation that is based on variance calculations and Bayesian updating alongside an R package that has been developed to aid with EVSI calculations. An example based on the HomeHealth feasibility study will be demonstrated to show how the EVSI can be used in a real world setting. We also demonstrate the capabilities of an R Shiny tool that has been developed for the presentation of the EVSI to key stakeholders.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

“Laparoscopic Aortic Surgery: credible or just plain crazy?”

Dr Dominic PJ Howard, Mr Adam Howard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting the immune checkpoint receptor BTLA in autoimmunity and cancer

Chris Paluch

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Please arrive 5 minutes early for access to the building, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Translational Research in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

Dr Alan Khoo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Lian Lee

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 11:30 to 12:15

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, The Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Next generation sequencing to identify new genetic causes of familial craniosynostosis

Akiko Hashimoto

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

The Economic Benefits of a Neural Circuit Motif

Professor Simon Laughlin

The efficient utilisation of limiting resources (space, materials and energy) is an organisational principle that shapes neural circuits. Consequently a neural circuit motif might be favoured for its economic benefits. I verify this suggestion by examining a circuit motif found in the visual... Read more

The efficient utilisation of limiting resources (space, materials and energy) is an organisational principle that shapes neural circuits. Consequently a neural circuit motif might be favoured for its economic benefits. I verify this suggestion by examining a circuit motif found in the visual systems of both insects and vertebrates, where photoreceptors responsible for vision in bright light synapse onto second order neurons. Mindful of Marr’s three levels, I review work that shows that this motif performs a necessary computation using an efficient algorithm. I then demonstrate that the implementation brings economic benefits; it makes efficient use of space, materials and energy. The mechanisms employed and their organisation within the circuit reduce the resources required to achieve adequate function by one to two orders of magnitude. I conclude that efficiency shapes neural circuits and observe that four features used to increase efficiency are widely applicable. These are the elimination of unwanted input components prior to vesicle release, the use of non-vesicular mechanisms to apply estimates of population activity, unorthodox computations involving extracellular space, and polyadic synapses in which the transmitter released from a single vesicle drives more than one post-synaptic element, be it neuron or glia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

PLEASE NOTE THIS SEMINAR IS ON A FRIDAY. Title: Morphogenesis: from whole organism integration to biophysical principles

Professor Maria Leptin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

PLEASE NOTE THIS SEMINAR IS ON A FRIDAY

Fri 26 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WTCHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

The Repertoire of Mutational Signatures in Human Cancer

Ludmil B. Alexandrov

Cancer is the most common human genetic disease. All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. These mutations may be the consequence of the intrinsic slight infidelity of the DNA replication machinery, exogenous or endogenous mutagen exposures, enzymatic modification of DNA, or defective DNA... Read more

Cancer is the most common human genetic disease. All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. These mutations may be the consequence of the intrinsic slight infidelity of the DNA replication machinery, exogenous or endogenous mutagen exposures, enzymatic modification of DNA, or defective DNA repair. In some cancer types, a substantial proportion of somatic mutations are known to be generated by exogenous carcinogens, for example, tobacco smoking in lung cancers and ultraviolet light in skin cancers, or by abnormalities of DNA maintenance, for example, defective DNA mismatch repair in some colorectal cancers. Each biological process causing mutations leaves a characteristic imprint on the genome of a cancer cell, termed, mutational signature. In this talk, I will present mutational signatures analyses encompassing 23,517 cancer genomes across 40 distinct types of human cancer revealing more than 60 different signatures of mutational processes. Some signatures are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Mon 29 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Deciphering the tumour ecosystem

Dr Yinyin Yuang

My research focuses on the emerging concept that tumours are complex, evolving ecosystems with dynamic crosstalk between cancer and normal cells. Understanding how genetically diverse cancer cells adapt to and manipulate their microenvironment is critical for deciphering drivers of cancer... Read more

My research focuses on the emerging concept that tumours are complex, evolving ecosystems with dynamic crosstalk between cancer and normal cells. Understanding how genetically diverse cancer cells adapt to and manipulate their microenvironment is critical for deciphering drivers of cancer progression and evolution. To answer specific questions for a disease type, my team develops new approaches that are fusions of pathological image analysis, bioinformatics and ecological statistics. I will discuss how our study on spatial heterogeneity of immune response led to new appreciation of its clinical relevance in breast cancer within the context of clinical trials, and our recent progress on studying the relationship between microenvironmental diversification and lung cancer evolution in TRACERx.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Mon 29 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Exploiting Cancer’s Addiction to Deregulated G1/S Transcription

Professor Rob De Bruin

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 29 Jan 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Reconstructing the immune system using single cell RNA sequencing

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa

Muzlifah has used functional genomics, comparative biology and more recently single cell RNA sequencing to study human mononuclear phagocytes. In this seminar, she will discuss the power and utility of single cell RNA sequencing to understand the functional organisation of the human immune... Read more

Muzlifah has used functional genomics, comparative biology and more recently single cell RNA sequencing to study human mononuclear phagocytes. In this seminar, she will discuss the power and utility of single cell RNA sequencing to understand the functional organisation of the human immune system. --- Muzlifah Haniffa is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, Lister Institute Research Fellow and Consultant Dermatologist based in Newcastle University. She graduated from medical school in Cardiff and trained as a junior doctor in Cambridge. She received her dermatology specialist training in Newcastle. She was awarded an Action Medical Research Training Fellowship and a Wellcome Trust Clinical Intermediate Fellowship which allowed her to pursue a laboratory-based PhD research program with Matthew Collin in Newcastle and postdoctoral experience with Florent Ginhoux in Singapore. Her research programme aims to understand the functional organisation of the human immune system with a focus on mononuclear phagocytes.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 30 Jan 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Why do so many technology projects in healthcare fail? A new framework for studying the non-adoption, abandonment and failure of scale-up, spread and sustainability (NASSS) of health and care technologies

Professor Trish Greenhalgh

An apocryphal (but probably not wildly out) statistic suggests that 80% of technology-supported change projects in health and social care fail. We all know that’s because they’re complex. It’s time to unpack what that complexity is all about – because failed technology projects are costly,... Read more

An apocryphal (but probably not wildly out) statistic suggests that 80% of technology-supported change projects in health and social care fail. We all know that’s because they’re complex. It’s time to unpack what that complexity is all about – because failed technology projects are costly, wasteful and potentially harmful at both human and system level. Many promising technologies are not adopted at all (for example, because of clinician “resistance”) – or they are adopted but quickly abandoned (for example, when it becomes clear that using them creates problems somewhere else in the system). Technologies that are successfully adopted on a small scale (for example, in proof-of-concept demonstration projects – perhaps as part of a randomised controlled trial) may prove difficult or impossible to scale up locally beyond the initial team of enthusiasts, and/or impossible to spread elsewhere (even when the settings appear comparable). Finally, few technology projects are sustained over time in a way that adapts and evolves with a changing context. These five challenges (Non-adoption, Abandonment, and failure of Scale-up, Spread and Sustainability) inspired the development and testing of a framework (NASSS) to explain such phenomena. NASSS is based on the most extensive systematic review ever published on technology adoption in healthcare, plus a large and diverse sample of organisational case studies followed for up to three years. It considers seven domains – the illness or condition, the technology, the value proposition, individual adopters (patients, staff), the adopting organisation(s), the wider system and time. Each domain may be simple (that is, few components, clear categories and predictable), complicated (multiple components and issues), or complex (dynamic, ambiguous, unpredictable). Complexity in multiple NASSS domains appears strongly predictive of programme failure. Proactive attention to reducing complexity in the different NASSS domains early in the planning stages may reduce the risk of failure (though that hypothesis remains to be tested empirically). The NASSS framework was published in November 2017 and quickly became one of the most downloaded papers ever published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. Various researchers, design companies, consultancies and policymakers have begun to use it to guide, support and/or evaluate the development, adoption, implementation and scale-up of technology-supported programmes. This lecture will introduce the NASSS framework, give examples of its application and invite discussion on how it might be used and refined in the future.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Tue 30 Jan 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - The emergence of epidemiology and public health campaigns in Victorian Britain

Professor Sally Shuttleworth

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 31 Jan 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Bad Beginnings? A qualitative study of prison mother and baby units

Rose Mortimer, DPhil Student

In this presentation I will discuss some of the preliminary findings from my qualitative research in the mother and baby unit within HMP Styal, a women’s prison in the North West of England. In the UK, if a woman receives a custodial sentence when pregnant, or if she already has a baby in the... Read more

In this presentation I will discuss some of the preliminary findings from my qualitative research in the mother and baby unit within HMP Styal, a women’s prison in the North West of England. In the UK, if a woman receives a custodial sentence when pregnant, or if she already has a baby in the community, she can apply to serve her sentence in one of six prison Mother and Baby Units. These units prevent the separation of mum and baby by allowing the child to live within the prison, up to the age of 18 months. The units provide a number of services designed to support the mother and baby, including parenting classes, crèche, and activities that promote the child’s healthy development. The main aim is to foster strong attachment, and to promote ‘good parenting’. In this presentation I have two aims. First, to describe the ‘moral world’ of the mother and baby unit, highlighting the central values and commitments that are in play, and exploring how these are practiced and negotiated by different actors. In particular, I discuss how the prison’s goal of rehabilitation is tied to the identities of these women as mothers, and how different stakeholders define a ‘good mother’ in this context. Second, I pose a normative question: how should the prison respect these women’s autonomy as mothers, whilst also restricting their liberty as prisoners? In order to answer this question, I consider the relative importance of a range of important yet often conflicting ethical values, including justice, care, trust and responsibility. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 31 Jan 2018 from 16:00 to 18:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Inaugural Seminar: Challenges and opportunities in population neuroimaging

Professor Thomas Nichols

Brain imaging studies have traditionally struggled to break into 3-digit sample sizes: e.g., a recent Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) meta-analysis of emotion found a median sample size of n=13. However, we now have a growing collection studies with sample sizes with 4-, 5- and even... Read more

Brain imaging studies have traditionally struggled to break into 3-digit sample sizes: e.g., a recent Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) meta-analysis of emotion found a median sample size of n=13. However, we now have a growing collection studies with sample sizes with 4-, 5- and even 6-digits. Many of these 'population neuroimaging' studies are epidemiological in nature, trying to characterise typical variation in the population to help predict health outcomes across the life span. I will discuss some of the challenges these studies present, in terms of massive computational burden but also in ways that they expose shortcomings of existing mass univariate techniques. I will also discuss how these datasets present intriguing methodological problems heretofore absent from neuroimaging statistics. For example, the 'null hypothesis fallacy' is how H0 is never strictly true, and yet with 100,000 subjects you'll eventually find some effect even if it is meaningless. This motivates work spatial confidence sets on meaningful effect sizes (instead of thresholding test statistic images), providing intuitive measures of spatial uncertainty. I'll discuss these findings and other work our group has done in this area.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John