Other Seminars

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Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Ethics training and advice for CUREC and NHS ethics applications

Dr Helen Barnby-Porritt

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dan Richards-Doran

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 11:15 to 12:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 2 Academic Corridor, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington OX3 9DU

Redirecting the cellular information flow with programmable dCas9-based chimeric receptors

Toni Baeumler

Audience: Members of the University only

Viva Seminar

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm D / Infection Microbiology

Dr Adam Darowski

Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A fistful of tablets - The good, the bad and the ugly", Dr Adam Darowski -- Infection Microbiology: "Of Mites and Men", Prof Nick Day -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Acute General Medicine Firm D: "A fistful of tablets - The good, the bad and the ugly", Dr Adam Darowski -- Infection Microbiology: "Of Mites and Men", Prof Nick Day -- Chair: Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 19 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Immortal Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Their Epigenetic Regulation”

Margaret (“Peggy”) Goodell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 09:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

Oxford Single Cell Symposium 2018

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Cloke

Speakers so far confirmed are: Wolf Reik (Babraham Institute); Ido Amit (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Dr Caroline Colijn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre , Headington OX3 7LF

Mon 23 Apr 2018 from 14:30 to 15:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Imaging Genetics of the Human Face

Peter Claes

Peter Claes of KU Leuven will discuss: - modular phenotyping to discover facially related genetic loci - new computational framework to match faces to probe DNA - innovative applications to establish human identity from DNA

Peter Claes of KU Leuven will discuss: - modular phenotyping to discover facially related genetic loci - new computational framework to match faces to probe DNA - innovative applications to establish human identity from DNA

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00

NDM Building, Basement Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Malaria 2018: What's the Score? AND Malaria in the Asia-Pacific: Pervasive, Singular, Diverse, and Invisible

Professor Kevin Marsh, Professor Kevin Baird

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Georgina Humphreys

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 12:45 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Please note earlier start time for these presentations

Tue 24 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

T-reg and T-effector subsets dynamics in viral infections

Nabil Seddiki

Dr Nabila SEDDIKI is a Senior Lecturer at the Paris-Est Créteil University (UPEC). She holds an INSERM “Chaire d’Excellence en Immunologie et Maladies Infectieuses”. She joined the Vaccine Research Institute (Créteil, France) end of 2010. Before that she was a Research Fellow at the... Read more

Dr Nabila SEDDIKI is a Senior Lecturer at the Paris-Est Créteil University (UPEC). She holds an INSERM “Chaire d’Excellence en Immunologie et Maladies Infectieuses”. She joined the Vaccine Research Institute (Créteil, France) end of 2010. Before that she was a Research Fellow at the Centenary Institute (University of Sydney) and then a Senior Scientist at the National Centre for HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research (University of New South Wales). Dr Seddiki’s research interests are focused on the cellular and molecular characterisation of T-cell subsets. She is particularly interested in investigating the dynamics of antigen-specific T regulatory (Treg), T follicular helper and effector CD4+ T-cell subsets in viral infections. More recently, she has been investigating the role of microRNA and chromatin remodeling in the regulation of target molecules during HIV-1 infection. Her talk will focus on “T-reg and T-effector subsets dynamics in viral infections”, i.e HIV-infected and treated patients who received therapeutic vaccination and she will discuss her current work on how to improve therapeutic vaccination. Also, she will share new, non-published data on T-follicular helper cell (Tfh) subsets in influenza infection.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Dr Proochista Ariana

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 12:45 to 14:00

Psychiatry Seminars

Department of Psychiatry, Common Room, Headington OX3 7JX

Wed 25 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 13:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the endothelial to hematopoietic transition

Lucas Greder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Viva Seminar

Thu 26 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Stem cell function in homeostasis, aging and cancer: interplay between time, diet and epigenetics

Salvador Aznar Benitah

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 26 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Clinical Immunology / Dermatology

Dr Adrian Shields

Clinical Immunology: "Chasing waterfalls: when the complement cascade spills over", Dr Adrian Shields -- Dermatology: -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Clinical Immunology: "Chasing waterfalls: when the complement cascade spills over", Dr Adrian Shields -- Dermatology: -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Deep brain stimulation for human brain disorders: Expanding indications and the brain machine interface

Professor Peter Silburn

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Enhanced immunogenicity of mitochondrial localised mutated proteins in cancer cells

Dr Gennaro Prota

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Functional specificity of excitatory and inhibitory connections in neocortex

Professor Sonja Hofer

To follow

To follow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 27 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding and treating lysosomal diseases

Prof Frances Platt

Short abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), - designated as "orphan" diseases - are inborn errors of metabolism caused by defects in genes that encode proteins involved in various aspects of lysosomal homeostasis. For many years LSDs were viewed as unattractive targets for the development... Read more

Short abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), - designated as "orphan" diseases - are inborn errors of metabolism caused by defects in genes that encode proteins involved in various aspects of lysosomal homeostasis. For many years LSDs were viewed as unattractive targets for the development of therapies owing to their low prevalence. However, the development and success of the first commercial biologic therapy for a LSD - enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for type 1 Gaucher disease - coupled with regulatory incentives, rapidly catalyzed commercial interest in therapeutically targeting LSDs. Despite ongoing challenges, various therapeutic strategies for LSDs now exist, with many agents approved, undergoing clinical trials or in preclinical development. I will review these diseases, the status of therapies and our current work on therapeutic development for Niemann-Pick disease type C. Short bio: Fran Platt was educated at Imperial College (BSc, Zoology) and did her PhD at the University of Bath in Animal Physiology. She went to Washington University Medical School in St Louis USA where she was a post-doctoral fellow. She returned to the UK in 1989 where she joined the Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford. She was awarded a Lister Institute Senior Research Fellowship in 1996. She moved her laboratory to the Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford in 2006. Her main interest is in lysosomal biology and pathobiology. Her research has led to the development and approval of a drug (miglustat) for substrate reduction therapy for the treatment of glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases. She was elected a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Statistical strategies for enhanced metabolic phenotyping and biomarker recovery

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate... Read more

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate statistical modelling tools, have been shown to be well-suited to generating metabolic signatures reflecting gene-environment interactions. Consequent demand for sensitive, high quality disease diagnostics has facilitated the development of new technological and statistical methods for extracting biomarkers from NMR spectra resulting in improved elucidation of pathological mechanisms. The combination of multiple spectroscopic and statistical approaches is most effective, thus an analytical strategy for spectral alignment, scaling, curve resolution and quantification, statistical correlation and annotation is desirable. An analytical pipeline is presented with particular focus on a series of methods for enhancing biomarker detection via a family of statistical correlation algorithms. Key bottlenecks in integrating metabolic profiling into translational medicine pipelines or workflows include: lack of automated peak/metabolite annotation; introduction of artefacts due to alignment and pre-processing algorithms; lack of standardisation across laboratories; and limited availability of methods capturing dynamic metabolic changes that can accommodate missing data. An outline of the current bottlenecks in data processing, modelling and interpretation is given with suggestions of statistical tools for overcoming some of these limitations focussing on homospectroscopic or heterospectroscopic correlation algorithms, adjustment for multiple confounders and time series analysis as a suite of tools that can be applied to extract new correlates between datasets and establish biological coherence across metabolic pathways and networks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Statistical strategies for enhanced metabolic phenotyping and biomarker recovery

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate... Read more

The metabolic phenotype can provide a window onto dynamic biochemical responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. Metabolic profiling platforms for analyzing biosamples, encompassing high-resolution spectroscopic methods (NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS, GC-MS etc) in combination with multivariate statistical modelling tools, have been shown to be well-suited to generating metabolic signatures reflecting gene-environment interactions. Consequent demand for sensitive, high quality disease diagnostics has facilitated the development of new technological and statistical methods for extracting biomarkers from NMR spectra resulting in improved elucidation of pathological mechanisms. The combination of multiple spectroscopic and statistical approaches is most effective, thus an analytical strategy for spectral alignment, scaling, curve resolution and quantification, statistical correlation and annotation is desirable. An analytical pipeline is presented with particular focus on a series of methods for enhancing biomarker detection via a family of statistical correlation algorithms. Key bottlenecks in integrating metabolic profiling into translational medicine pipelines or workflows include: lack of automated peak/metabolite annotation; introduction of artefacts due to alignment and pre-processing algorithms; lack of standardisation across laboratories; and limited availability of methods capturing dynamic metabolic changes that can accommodate missing data. An outline of the current bottlenecks in data processing, modelling and interpretation is given with suggestions of statistical tools for overcoming some of these limitations focussing on homospectroscopic or heterospectroscopic correlation algorithms, adjustment for multiple confounders and time series analysis as a suite of tools that can be applied to extract new correlates between datasets and establish biological coherence across metabolic pathways and networks.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Old and new functions of BRCA1

Professor Jo Morris PhD MSc

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor , Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Using electronic health records in health economic modelling studies

Professor Martin Gulliford

This talk will outline a possible role of electronic health records in health economic evaluation. The talk will initially discuss the strengths and limitations of primary care electronic health records and linked data. It will go on to describe several studies in which EHRs have been used to... Read more

This talk will outline a possible role of electronic health records in health economic evaluation. The talk will initially discuss the strengths and limitations of primary care electronic health records and linked data. It will go on to describe several studies in which EHRs have been used to estimate costs of health care utilisation, including case studies in obesity and ageing. The final section of the talk will describe the use of EHRs in economic evaluations using either observational or trial data. Speakers Bio: Martin Gulliford is Professor of Public Health in the School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences at King's College London. He qualified in medicine from the University of Cambridge and University College Hospital, London and trained in public health and health services research at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Medical Schools London where he was a Wellcome Training Fellow in Health Services Research. Martin's research interests are in epidemiology as applied to public health and health services research. His current research focuses on the use of electronic health records to evaluate public health interventions. This includes public health trials with either cluster or individual level randomisation, as well as health economic modelling studies. The main areas of application are in obesity, chronic disease prevention, ageing and antimicrobial utilisation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Brett Doble

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Ana Rivero

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

LAB282: Accelerating Oxford drug discovery

Dr Thomas Hanke

Evotec is a global drug discovery company with a focus on matching scientific diligence with industrial robustness to accelerate preclinical development of novel therapeutics that have the potential to become first- or best-in-class drugs. To improve quality and speed of innovation, Evotec... Read more

Evotec is a global drug discovery company with a focus on matching scientific diligence with industrial robustness to accelerate preclinical development of novel therapeutics that have the potential to become first- or best-in-class drugs. To improve quality and speed of innovation, Evotec developed a novel risk-share paradigm of close collaboration with academic centers of excellence –termed the Academic BRIDGE- where preclinical validation of therapeutic concepts in an integrated business framework aims to significantly shorten the time between drug development idea and commercially attractive preclinical data. With LAB282, in November 2016 the first Academic BRIDGE took shape in Oxford. LAB282 (www.lab282.org) is a £13m partnership between the University of Oxford, OUI, OSI and Evotec that offers Oxford researchers across different therapeutic areas and departments the opportunity to access translational funding to advance therapeutic concepts and create a basis for future commercialization. Since inception, twelve different projects have been awarded funding between £25k and £500k. The presentation will provide insights into the LAB282 concept, discuss learnings after the first 1.5 years and be a forum to discuss how scientists from the Kennedy Institute could benefit from LAB282 in the future. ---- Since December 2016, Thomas is overseeing a growing portfolio of strategic academic partnerships at Evotec, including Lab282 in Oxford. From November 2013 to November 2016, Thomas was responsible for scientific advancement and commercial licensing of Evotec’s preclinical R&D projects in the areas of inflammation and immuno-oncology, with a particular focus on building high-value, performance based drug discovery alliances with academia and pharma. From 2007 to 2013, Thomas was Sourcing Director at the Biopharmaceuticals Research Unit of Novo Nordisk, where he identified and evaluated partnering opportunities related to compounds, targets and technologies within haemophilia, autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, growth disorders and protein technologies. At Novo Nordisk, Thomas initiated a multitude of agreements with academic institutions and biotech companies both in Europe and the US. Prior to joining Novo Nordisk, Thomas was co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer at the German biotech company TeGenero, where he headed the R&D efforts to develop first-in-class immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (2002-2007). Preceding his entrepreneurial activities, Thomas was group leader and Assistant Professor for Immunobiology at the University of Würzburg (1999-2002) following a PostDoc at the University of California in Berkeley where he researched basic cellular immunology (1996-1999). Thomas received his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Würzburg in 1995. He is (co-) author of approx. 30 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals. Today, Thomas has 20+ years of experience in research and drug development in academia, biotech and pharma. Fostering innovation and continuous improvement, Thomas manages cross-functional teams as an assessor / developer, sets directions and builds trust in a company.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 30 Apr 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

How our genomes are copied

Professor John Diffley

Audience: Public

Organisers: Kevin Clark